polysyllable


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pol·y·syl·la·ble

 (pŏl′ē-sĭl′ə-bəl)
n.
A word of more than two and usually more than three syllables.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

polysyllable

(ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbəl)
n
(Linguistics) a word consisting of more than two syllables
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pol•y•syl•la•ble

(ˈpɒl iˌsɪl ə bəl, ˌpɒl iˈsɪl-)

n.
a polysyllabic word.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

polysyllable

A word that contains many syllables.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polysyllable - a word of more than three syllables
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
jawbreaker - a word that is hard to pronounce
sesquipedalia, sesquipedalian - a very long word (a foot and a half long)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

polysyllable

[ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbl] Npolisílabo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

polysyllable

nPolysyllabum nt (spec), → vielsilbiges Wort
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

polysyllable

[ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbl] npolisillabo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Spite is a little word; but it represents as strange a jumble of feelings, and compound of discords, as any polysyllable in the language.
She could have informed you that there was such a word as "polygamy," and being also acquainted with "polysyllable," she had deduced the conclusion that "poly" mean "many"; but she had had no idea that gypsies were not well supplied with groceries, and her thoughts generally were the oddest mixture of clear-eyed acumen and blind dreams.
The first project was, to shorten discourse, by cutting polysyllables into one, and leaving out verbs and participles, because, in reality, all things imaginable are but norms.
In some of his works, especially 'The Rambler,' where, it has been jocosely suggested, he was exercising the polysyllables that he wished to put into his 'Dictionary,' he does employ a stilted Latinized vocabulary and a stilted style, with too much use of abstract phrases for concrete ones, too many long sentences, much inverted order, and over-elaborate balance.
The adverse destinies ordained that one evening Mr Wegg's labouring bark became beset by polysyllables, and embarrassed among a perfect archipelago of hard words.
The otherwise forgettable plot included Clive Owen, as an alcoholic poet and plagiarising English teacher, badgering Binoche into playing his show-off polysyllable game: "I'll give you a five-syllable word, you give me one of six syllables."
By counting the number of words of more than two syllables (polysyllable count) in 30 sentences, he provides this simple formula:
The only polysyllable in the stanza, it also inverts the poem's iambic metrical pattern.
I used to think in long compound sentences with subordinate clauses and even the odd polysyllable. Now I find I needn't.
In a poem that is so consistently Germanic and monosyllabic in its diction, (7) this polysyllable stands out in all its foreignness: an exotic bird with an exotic name.
This is often the case with words of four or more syllables, but phrasal analysis reveals that a string of unstressed monosyllables usually will mimic the stress patterning of a polysyllable. In other words, the forces that determine the rhythmic profile of any Italian utterance are independent of lexical structure.
Berg (1989) reinforces this point by suggesting that unstressed initial syllables may be treated as a 'phonological appendix' to an onset-rime (disyllable) or onset-superrime (polysyllable) division (see Figure 2).