polysyllable

(redirected from polysyllables)
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pol·y·syl·la·ble

 (pŏl′ē-sĭl′ə-bəl)
n.
A word of more than two and usually more than three syllables.

polysyllable

(ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbəl)
n
(Linguistics) a word consisting of more than two syllables

pol•y•syl•la•ble

(ˈpɒl iˌsɪl ə bəl, ˌpɒl iˈsɪl-)

n.
a polysyllabic word.

polysyllable

A word that contains many syllables.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polysyllable - a word of more than three syllables
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
jawbreaker - a word that is hard to pronounce
sesquipedalia, sesquipedalian - a very long word (a foot and a half long)
Translations

polysyllable

[ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbl] Npolisílabo m

polysyllable

nPolysyllabum nt (spec), → vielsilbiges Wort

polysyllable

[ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbl] npolisillabo
References in classic literature ?
The first project was, to shorten discourse, by cutting polysyllables into one, and leaving out verbs and participles, because, in reality, all things imaginable are but norms.
In some of his works, especially 'The Rambler,' where, it has been jocosely suggested, he was exercising the polysyllables that he wished to put into his 'Dictionary,' he does employ a stilted Latinized vocabulary and a stilted style, with too much use of abstract phrases for concrete ones, too many long sentences, much inverted order, and over-elaborate balance.
The adverse destinies ordained that one evening Mr Wegg's labouring bark became beset by polysyllables, and embarrassed among a perfect archipelago of hard words.
Spite is a little word; but it represents as strange a jumble of feelings, and compound of discords, as any polysyllable in the language.
She could have informed you that there was such a word as "polygamy," and being also acquainted with "polysyllable," she had deduced the conclusion that "poly" mean "many"; but she had had no idea that gypsies were not well supplied with groceries, and her thoughts generally were the oddest mixture of clear-eyed acumen and blind dreams.
They understand that words are formed by different numbers of syllables and that, for this reason, some words are larger than others (monosyllables, disyllables, trisyllables and polysyllables), and they acquire intrasyllabic awareness, that is, the understanding that syllables are made up of minimal units.
We have reached a stage when the very word "Socialism" calls up, on the one hand, a picture of aeroplanes, tractors, and huge glittering factories of glass and concrete; on the other, a picture of vegetarians with wilting beards, of Bolshevik commissars (half gangster, half gramophone), of earnest ladies in sandals, shock-headed Marxists chewing polysyllables, escaped Quakers, birth-control fanatics, and Labour Party backstairs-crawlers.
The Family of Love and particularly The Insatiate Countess, both acts analyzed, also resemble Marston's style, with a "dip" on 6, but the stressing on syllable 10 is higher and on 8 lower than in Marston's earlier plays, because there are fewer polysyllables at the end of its lines, such as long names of personages (Antonio and Mellida) and Romance borrowings (Histriomastix), and more verse lines scattered among long passages of prose and non-iambic verse, so ends of iambic pentameter lines need to be made more marked by a stress.
Along the way "material culture" becomes "objects," "artifacts" with "agency." He makes his keywords do much more work than careful analysis of what he is saying should allow, with too many assertions and too little careful analysis of what his rapidly flowing polysyllables might mean; too many claims about grammar school education "decontextualizing" the historical particularity of unspecified examples; too frequent references to anonymous "scholars" who now all assume something.
In the three cases, half of the stimuli have short extension (monosyllables and disyllables) and the other half have long extension (trisyllables and polysyllables).
The adagio rhythm is determined by a plain syntax in which enumerations and polysyllables naturally become salient and elicit a sense of "elongation" and almost "slow relaxation".
(1) Similar to the Flesch-Kincaid grade level model, the SMOG formula calculates the grade level correlating with the difficulty of the text according to the formula: SMOG grade = (1.0430 x SRPC) + 3.1291, where SRPC refers to the square root of the number of polysyllables (words with three or more syllables).