fatty acids

(redirected from polyunsaturated fatty acids)
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fatty acids

Chains of carbon and hydrogen atoms forming molecules that are the basic building blocks of fats.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists looked for markers including carotenoids (antioxidants, which reduce disease), isoflavones (anti-inflammatories), enterolactone (which breaks down plant-based foods in the gut flora), saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, and vitamins.
The interactions between endogenous metabolism and introduced biochemical pathways will be analysed using Camelina lines engineered to produce non-native, very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The potential to exploit novel regulatory mechanisms (including nuclear RNA export and targeted protein degradation) will also be explored.
Higher levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the blood is associated with a lower risk of several chronic diseases, according to research published online Oct.
[USA], Nov 16 (ANI): According to a study, pregnant women should increase the intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) to reduce the risk of premature births.
Chan School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues reviewed the evidence relating to the impact of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from seafood consumption on clinical cardiovascular events.
The oil of sunflower contains more polyunsaturated fatty acids and many other molecules that are responsible for the different health benefits of sunflower oil.
Depending on the nature of the structural chemistry of these chains, fatty acid can be categorized as saturated or unsaturated; the unsaturated fatty acids can be further classified into monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Oils rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) also provide essential fats that your body needs but can't produce itself, such as the omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids.
Adopting a healthy diet is considered a key factor in reducing the risk of heart attack, and many studies have suggested that including omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as part of such a diet is particularly beneficial for heart health.
Previous studies have suggested links between poor sleep and low blood levels of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC- PUFAs), among infants and in children and adults with behavior or learning difficulties.
In an article published in the Journal of Nutrition, Ilse Reinders and colleagues report an association between higher plasma phospholipid omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and lower pulse wave velocity, a measure of arterial stiffness which, when increased, has been correlated with a greater risk of cardiovascular disease and related mortality.