pomegranate


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Related to pomegranate: pomegranate tree

pom·e·gran·ate

 (pŏm′ĭ-grăn′ĭt, pŏm′grăn′ĭt, pŭm′ĭ-, pŭm′-)
n.
1. A deciduous shrub or small tree (Punica granatum) native to Asia and widely cultivated for its edible fruit.
2. The fruit of this tree, having a tough reddish rind and containing numerous seeds surrounded by tart juicy red pulp.

[Middle English pome granate, from Old French pome grenate : pome, apple; see pome + grenate, having many seeds (from Latin grānātus, from grānum, grain, seed; see gr̥ə-no- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pomegranate

(ˈpɒmɪˌɡrænɪt; ˈpɒmˌɡrænɪt)
n
1. (Plants) an Asian shrub or small tree, Punica granatum, cultivated in semitropical regions for its edible fruit: family Punicaceae
2. (Plants) the many-chambered globular fruit of this tree, which has tough reddish rind, juicy red pulp, and many seeds
[C14: from Old French pome grenate, from Latin pōmum apple + grenate, from Latin grānātum, from grānātus full of seeds]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pome•gran•ate

(ˈpɒmˌgræn ɪt, ˈpɒm ɪ-, ˈpʌm-)

n.
1. a round fruit with a leathery red rind, containing membranous chambers filled with a juicy, tart red pulp and white seeds.
2. the small tree, Punica granatum, of the family Punicaceae, that bears this fruit.
[1275–1325; Middle English poumgarnet, pomegarnade (< Old French pome grenate, pome gernete), representing Medieval Latin pōmum grānātum literally, seedy apple. See pome, grenade]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pomegranate - shrub or small tree native to southwestern Asia having large red many-seeded fruitpomegranate - shrub or small tree native to southwestern Asia having large red many-seeded fruit
pomegranate - large globular fruit having many seeds with juicy red pulp in a tough brownish-red rind
genus Punica, Punica - coextensive with the family Punicaceae
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
2.pomegranate - large globular fruit having many seeds with juicy red pulp in a tough brownish-red rind
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
pomegranate, pomegranate tree, Punica granatum - shrub or small tree native to southwestern Asia having large red many-seeded fruit
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
رُمَّانشَجَرَة الرُمّان
granátové jablko
granatæble
GranatapfelGrenadine
granato
انار
granaattiomena
nar
gránátalma
granatepli
ザクロ
석류
granatas
granātābols
rodierodiu
granátové jablko
granatäpple
ผลทับทิม
انار
lựu

pomegranate

[ˈpɒməgrænɪt] N (= fruit) → granada f; (= tree) → granado m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pomegranate

[ˈpɒmɪgrænət] ngrenade f (fruit)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pomegranate

nGranatapfel m; (= tree)Granatapfelbaum m, → Granatbaum m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pomegranate

[ˈpɒmɪˌgrænɪt] n (tree) → melograno; (fruit) → melagrana
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

pomegranate

(ˈpomigrӕnət) noun
a type of fruit with a thick skin and many seeds.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

pomegranate

رُمَّان granátové jablko granatæble Granatapfel ρόδι granada granaattiomena grenade nar melagrana ザクロ 석류 granaatappel granateple granat romã гранат granatäpple ผลทับทิม nar lựu 石榴
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
THE POMEGRANATE and Apple-Tree disputed as to which was the most beautiful.
Unfortunately, however, this was during the time when Ceres had forbidden any fruits or vegetables to grow; and, after seeking all over the earth, King Pluto's servant found only a single pomegranate, and that so dried up as not to be worth eating.
At its heels was a wolf, who had almost seized it, when the cat changed itself into a worm, and, piercing the skin of a pomegranate which had tumbled from a tree, hid itself in the fruit.
Here again she received a present with the same injunctions, but instead of a nut this lady gave her a golden pomegranate. The mournful Princess had to continue her weary way, and after many troubles and hardships she again found rest and shelter in a third house exactly similar to the two others.
They entered; behind a glass window, by the light of the cardinal's lantern, which had been placed on the floor in the midst of the gallery, they saw the orange and pomegranate trees of the Castle of Rueil, in long lines, forming one great alley and two smaller side alleys.
In the First Part of this history we left the valiant Biscayan and the renowned Don Quixote with drawn swords uplifted, ready to deliver two such furious slashing blows that if they had fallen full and fair they would at least have split and cleft them asunder from top to toe and laid them open like a pomegranate; and at this so critical point the delightful history came to a stop and stood cut short without any intimation from the author where what was missing was to be found.
There is no amaranth, no pomegranate here, But can your heart forget the Christmas rose, The crocuses and snowdrops once so dear?
But he on his part secretly gave her sweet pomegranate seed to eat, taking care for himself that she might not remain continually with grave, dark- robed Demeter.
There flourish the olive, the fig, the date, the orange, the citron, the pomegranate, and other fruits belonging to the voluptuous climates of the south; with grapes in abundance, that yield a generous wine.
It had a shell harder even than iron; within which were arranged, like the seeds of a pomegranate, jewels of various colors; some transparent as crystals; others of a fine red, and others of mixed hues.
After these two noble fruits of friendship (peace in the affections, and support of the judgment), followeth the last fruit; which is like the pomegranate, full of many kernels; I mean aid, and bearing a part, in all actions and occasions.
with pomegranate, fig, olive and quince orchards, and nooned an hour