poncho


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pon·cho

 (pŏn′chō)
n. pl. pon·chos
1. A blanketlike cloak having a hole in the center for the head.
2. A similar garment having a hood used as a raincoat.

[American Spanish, from Spanish, cape, perhaps variant of pocho, faded, discolored.]

poncho

(ˈpɒntʃəʊ)
n, pl -chos
(Clothing & Fashion) a cloak of a kind originally worn in South America, made of a rectangular or circular piece of cloth, esp wool, with a hole in the middle to put the head through
[C18: from American Spanish, from Araucanian pantho woollen material]

pon•cho

(ˈpɒn tʃoʊ)

n., pl. -chos.
1. a blanketlike cloak with an opening in the center to admit the head, orig. worn in South America.
2. a waterproof garment styled like this, worn as a raincoat.
[1710–20; < American Spanish < Araucanian]
pon′choed, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poncho - a blanket-like cloak with a hole in the center for the headponcho - a blanket-like cloak with a hole in the center for the head
cloak - a loose outer garment
Translations
مِعْطَف واقٍ من المَطَر
pončo
poncho
poncsó
ponsjó, axla-/herîaskjól
pončas
pončo
pončo
panço

poncho

[ˈpɒntʃəʊ] N (ponchos (pl)) → poncho m, manta f, ruana f (Col, Ven), sarape m (Mex), jorongo m (Mex)

poncho

[ˈpɒntʃəʊ] nponcho m

poncho

nPoncho m

poncho

[ˈpɒntʃəʊ] nponcho m inv

poncho

(ˈpontʃəu) plural ˈponchos noun
a garment made of, or like, a blanket, with a hole for the head.
References in classic literature ?
exclaimed Ned, shaking his poncho and getting rid of some of the water that had settled on it.
We have our ponchos, and we are not fair-weather explorers.
For the whale is indeed wrapt up in his blubber as in a real blanket or counterpane; or, still better, an Indian poncho slipt over his head, and skirting his extremity.
In the course of his lounging about the camp, however, he got possession of a deer skin; whereupon, cutting a slit in the middle, he thrust his head through it, so that the two ends hung down before and behind, something like a South American poncho, or the tabard of a herald.
I'm awful frightened," she said, naively; "whoever would have thought that Poncho would have been so scared by a lot of cows?
Lord John lay silent, wrapped in the South American poncho which he wore, while Challenger snored with a roll and rattle which reverberated through the woods.
There was a hole or slit in the middle of this mat, as you see the same in South American ponchos.
Poor Indians, not having anything better, only pull a thread out of their ponchos, and fasten it to the tree.
Having been musically influenced by prominent figures of Latin Jazz, conga drummer and composer Chano Pozo and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, Poncho Sanchez has joined forces multi-Grammy winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard to pay tribute to the two in his previous albums.
Finally, Poncho Sanchez will be joined by trumpeter Terrene Blanchard on closing night, putting on a Latin-infused set ahead of pop star Ricky Martin.
This poncho is worked back and forth in rows and seamed.
With Poncho otherwise occupied, I ran after the squirrel, trying put it up a tree before it could escape into a Carolina bay, otherwise known by its Native American word, "pocosin," meaning "swamp on a hill.