ponderously


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pon·der·ous

 (pŏn′dər-əs)
adj.
1. Having great weight: "The new metal ... was denser, more ponderous than gold" (Oliver Sacks).
2.
a. Slow and labored because of great bulk or weight: "The massive turtle ... trudged on resolutely, making good time for such a labored and ponderous gait" (Rick Bass).
b. Difficult to maneuver or control because of great bulk or weight: ponderous luggage.
c. Slow or difficult to manage, especially because of complexity: ponderous legal procedures.
3. Dull and lacking grace or fluency: a ponderous speech. See Synonyms at heavy.

[Middle English, from Old French pondereux, from Latin ponderōsus, from pondus, ponder-, weight; see (s)pen- in Indo-European roots.]

pon′der·ous·ly adv.
pon′der·ous·ness, pon′der·os′i·ty (-ŏs′ĭ-tē) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.ponderously - in an uninterestingly ponderous manner; "the play was staged with ponderously realistic sets"
2.ponderously - in a heavy ponderous manner; "he moves ponderously"
Translations

ponderously

[ˈpɒndərəslɪ] ADVpesadamente; [say etc] → en tono pesado, lentamente y con énfasis

ponderously

advschwerfällig; (= seriously) formalgewichtig, gravitätisch

ponderously

[ˈpɒndrəslɪ] advpesantemente, ponderosamente
References in classic literature ?
It was restful and satisfying to sprawl upon his rough pate and pour one's vague hopes and aspirations into the great ears which flapped ponderously to and fro in apparent understanding.
With lowered forehead, without looking up, swiftly and ponderously he crossed the room to one of the French windows.
As he drew near, he slackened speed, took the middle of the street, leaned far over to star- board and rounded to ponderously and with laborious pomp and circumstance -- for he was personating the Big Missouri, and considered himself to be drawing nine feet of water.
He then ponderously marched his charge to the door, where, assuredly, he did a strange thing.
He cast but one glance at it, then swooned ponderously to the floor.
He used to tell with great glee how they were wont to shake their heads mournfully at the price, to accomplish ponderously a bit of mental arithmetic, and then to say, "But you can't make six per cent on it."
The Irishman swung ponderously. Billy ducked, cutting his apology short, and as the sledge-like fist passed over his head, he drove his left to the other's jaw.
When it was understood, however, that the Colonel intended to erect a family mansion-spacious, ponderously framed of oaken timber, and calculated to endure for many generations of his posterity over the spot first covered by the log-built hut of Matthew Maule, there was much shaking of the head among the village gossips.
"A narrow and deserted street in deep shadow, high houses, innumerable windows with venetian blinds, a dead silence, grass sprouting between the stones, imposing carriage archways right and left, immense double doors standing ponderously ajar.
That gentleman stepped forward, ponderously willing to please, and placed his hand on the board.
He was silent and sensitive, and ready to sigh and languish ponderously (as only fat men CAN sigh and languish) on the smallest provocation.
He drove furiously, standing up, brandishing his whip, shaking the reins over the gray horse that galloped ponderously, making the heavy harness leap upon his broad quarters.