pony


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po·ny

 (pō′nē)
n. pl. po·nies
1. A horse of any of several stocky breeds that are small in size when full grown, such as the Shetland pony.
2.
a. Informal A racehorse.
b. Sports A polo horse.
3. Something small for its kind, especially a small glass for beer or liqueur.
4. A word-for-word translation of a foreign language text, especially one used as an aid in studying or test-taking. Also called crib, trot.
5. Chiefly British The sum of 25 pounds.
tr.v. po·nied, po·ny·ing, po·nies
To lead (a horse) with another horse.
Phrasal Verb:
pony up Slang
To pay (money owed or due).

[Probably from obsolete French poulenet, diminutive of poulain, colt, from Late Latin pullāmen, young of an animal, from Latin pullus; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

pony

(ˈpəʊnɪ)
n, pl ponies
1. (Animals) any of various breeds of small horse, usually under 14.2 hands
2.
a. a small drinking glass, esp for liqueurs
b. the amount held by such a glass
3. anything small of its kind
4. (Gambling, except Cards) slang Brit a sum of £25, esp in bookmaking
5. (Education) slang Also called: trot US a literal translation used by students, often illicitly, in preparation for foreign language lessons or examinations; crib
[C17: from Scottish powney, perhaps from obsolete French poulenet a little colt, from poulain colt, from Latin pullus young animal, foal]

po•ny

(ˈpoʊ ni)

n., pl. -nies, n.
1. a small horse of any of several breeds, usu. not higher at the shoulder than 14½ hands (58 in./146 cm).
2. Slang. a racehorse.
3. Informal. a literal translation or summary of a text, used illicitly as an aid in schoolwork; crib.
4. something small of its kind.
5. a small glass holding about one ounce (30 ml) of liqueur.
6. a small beverage bottle, often holding seven ounces (196 g).
v.
7. pony up, Informal. to pay (money), as to settle an account.
[1650–60; < French (now obsolete) poulenet, diminutive of poulain colt < Medieval Latin pullānus (Latin pull(us) foal + -ānus -an1); see -et]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pony - a range horse of the western United Statespony - a range horse of the western United States
Equus caballus, horse - solid-hoofed herbivorous quadruped domesticated since prehistoric times
mustang - small hardy range horse of the western plains descended from horses brought by the Spanish
cayuse, Indian pony - a small native range horse
2.pony - an informal term for a racehorse; "he liked to bet on the ponies"
bangtail, race horse, racehorse - a horse bred for racing
3.pony - a literal translation used in studying a foreign language (often used illicitly)
interlingual rendition, translation, version, rendering - a written communication in a second language having the same meaning as the written communication in a first language
4.pony - a small glass adequate to hold a single swallow of whiskeypony - a small glass adequate to hold a single swallow of whiskey
drinking glass, glass - a container for holding liquids while drinking
5.pony - any of various breeds of small gentle horses usually less than five feet high at the shoulder
Equus caballus, horse - solid-hoofed herbivorous quadruped domesticated since prehistoric times
Shetland pony - breed of very small pony with long shaggy mane and tail
Welsh pony - breed of small ponies originally from Wales
Exmoor - stocky breed of pony with a fawn-colored nose

pony

noun
Related words
collective noun herd
Translations
فَرَسٌ قَزَممُهْر،حِصان صَغير
poník
pony
poni
poni
póni
smáhestur
ポニー
조랑말
arklio uodegapasijodinėjimasponis
ponijs
poni
ponny
ม้าพันธุ์เล็ก
ngựa nhỏ

pony

[ˈpəʊnɪ]
A. N
1.poney m, potro m
2. (Brit) → 25 libras
3. (US) (Scol) → chuleta f
B. CPD pony trekking Nexcursión f en poney

pony

[ˈpəʊni] nponey m pony clubpony club n club équestre où l'on monte à poney

pony

n
Pony nt
(Brit sl) → 25 Pfund
(US sl: = crib) → Spickzettel m
(US inf: = small glass) → Gläschen nt

pony

:
pony express
nPonyexpress m
ponytail
nPferdeschwanz m; she was wearing her hair in a ponysie trug einen Pferdeschwanz
pony trekking
nPonyreiten nt; a pony holidayein Ponyreiturlaub m

pony

[ˈpəʊnɪ] npony m inv

pony

(ˈpəuni) plural ˈponies noun
a small horse. The child was riding a brown pony.
ˈpony-tail noun
(a kind of hairstyle with the) hair tied in a bunch at the back of the head.
ˈpony-trekking noun
the sport or pastime of riding in the countryside in small groups.

pony

فَرَسٌ قَزَم poník pony Pony πόνι poni poni poney poni pony ポニー 조랑말 pony ponni kucyk pónei, pônei пони ponny ม้าพันธุ์เล็ก midilli ngựa nhỏ 小马驹
References in classic literature ?
He drops his bridle on the pommel of his saddle, whistles to his pony, and disappears in the mist; riding with his hands in his pockets, and his pipe in his mouth, as composedly as if he were sitting by his own fireside at home.
It is rather unusual that a white man comes unheralded," he said, as they walked together toward the field into which he had suggested that the traveler might turn his pony.
Beside the little old gentleman sat a little old lady, plump and placid like himself, and the pony was coming along at his own pace and doing exactly as he pleased with the whole concern.
Janet, hire the grey pony and chaise tomorrow morning at ten o'clock, and pack up Master Trotwood's clothes tonight.
She turned without a word--they were both panting--and they went back to where the lady in white struggled to hold back the frightened pony.
To an audience the impression would be that in such fashion the pony was expressing its affection for the master.
Ask me some other time, when you can speak like a gentleman,' returned he, and he made an effort to pass me again; but I quickly re-captured the pony, scarce less astonished than its master at such uncivil usage.
Poyser's thoughts immediately reverted to him when, a day or two afterwards, as she was standing at the house- door with her knitting, in that eager leisure which came to her when the afternoon cleaning was done, she saw the old squire enter the yard on his black pony, followed by John the groom.
And I should delight to look round me from the brow of that tallest point: my little pony Minny shall take me some time.
The pony walked off independently to his stable, with the chaise behind him.
Boys, you see, think a horse or pony is like a steam-engine or a thrashing-machine, and can go on as long and as fast as they please; they never think that a pony can get tired, or have any feelings; so as the one who was whipping me could not understand I just rose up on my hind legs and let him slip off behind -- that was all.
The old soldier ambled up the village street, all shadowy in the dawn, on a punt, scissor-hocked pony.