poolroom

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pool·room

 (po͞ol′ro͞om′, -ro͝om′)
n.
1. A commercial establishment or room for the playing of pool or billiards. Also called pool hall.
2. A room where a bookmaker takes bets, as on horseracing.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

poolroom

(ˈpuːlˌruːm; -ˌrʊm)
n
(Billiards & Snooker) a hall or establishment where pool, billiards, etc, are played
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pool•room

(ˈpulˌrum, -ˌrʊm)

n.
1. an establishment or room for the playing of pool or billiards.
2. a bookmaker's establishment.
[1860–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poolroom - a room with pool tables where pool is played
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

poolroom

[ˈpuːlˌrʊm] nsala da biliardo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It was the same with the gambling-house keeper and the poolroom man, and the same with any other man or woman who had a means of getting "graft," and was willing to pay over a share of it: the green-goods man and the highwayman, the pickpocket and the sneak thief, and the receiver of stolen goods, the seller of adulterated milk, of stale fruit and diseased meat, the proprietor of unsanitary tenements, the fake doctor and the usurer, the beggar and the "pushcart man," the prize fighter and the professional slugger, the race-track "tout," the procurer, the white-slave agent, and the expert seducer of young girls.
It owned the legislatures in every state in which it did business; it even owned some of the big newspapers, and made public opinion--there was no power in the land that could oppose it unless, perhaps, it were the Poolroom Trust.
At this time drive-ins scaled back on their more extravagant entertainment extras, such as poolrooms and skating rinks (Lobban, 1996c).
libraries bathrooms poolrooms books hearses graveyards prisons circus
(1974), determination of location of shooting was possible in only 666 cases (51.54%) out of which 355 (53.30%) occurred inside and 40 (6%) outside the private houses while 91 (13.66%) cases took place at such places as bars, night clubs and poolrooms, 15 (2%) at the service stations, 19 (2.8%) at the victim's place of work and the remaining 127 (19.06%) at miscellaneous places that included church and cemetery.
This determination is based upon discussions among Blacks found in barbershops, beauty shops, poolrooms, restaurants, churches, and through organizing on the streets ...
By 1912, when he was thirty, Rothstein was a millionaire from the profits of his gambling parlors, poolrooms, and racetracks.
According to a correspondent for The Pas Herald, these included three stores, a post office, two poolrooms, two restaurants, a boarding house, laundry, hospital, church and school.
But they also fear the influence of the city: The streets, with their noise and flaring lights, the taverns, the automobiles, and the poolrooms claim them, and no voice of ours can call them back.
Discotheques like bars, poolrooms, restaurants and other entertainment centres in Bhutan are finding it hard to abide by the government imposed ban on smoking in public places, which came hot on the heels of the ban on sale of cigarettes on January 1.
Feeding quarters into those seductive devices in the back of Sophomore Sol's luncheonette on the University of Pennsylvania campus was our generation's equivalent of the poolrooms Professor Harold Hill warned about in "The Music Man"
For example, Lockwood claims to have started his career by performing "for Mom and Dad's society friends," as he is shown tap dancing in poolrooms to harmonica music and collecting thrown pennies from the floor.