populace

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populace

the common people; a population
Not to be confused with:
populous – having many people; numerous; crowded
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

pop·u·lace

 (pŏp′yə-lĭs)
n.
1. The general public; the masses.
2. A population.

[French, from Italian popolaccio, rabble, from popolo, the people, from Latin populus; see popular.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

populace

(ˈpɒpjʊləs)
n (sometimes functioning as plural)
1. the inhabitants of an area
2. the common people; masses
[C16: via French from Italian popolaccio the common herd, from popolo people, from Latin populus]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pop•u•lace

(ˈpɒp yə ləs)

n.
1. (in a community or nation) the common people as distinguished from the higher classes.
2. the inhabitants of a place; population.
[1565–75; < French < Italian popolaccio=popol(o) people + -accio pejorative suffix]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Populace

 the majority; the common people, 1572; the multitude, crowd or throng, 1871. See also mob.
Example: rural populace (the birds of the country), 1807.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.populace - people in general considered as a wholepopulace - people in general considered as a whole; "he is a hero in the eyes of the public"
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
admass - the segment of the public that is easily influenced by mass media (chiefly British)
audience - the part of the general public interested in a source of information or entertainment; "every artist needs an audience"; "the broadcast reached an audience of millions"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

populace

noun people, crowd, masses, mob, inhabitants, general public, multitude, throng, rabble, hoi polloi, Joe Public (slang), Joe Six-Pack (U.S. slang), commonalty a large proportion of the populace
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

populace

noun
The common people:
common (used in plural), commonality, commonalty, commoner (used in plural), crowd, hoi polloi, mass (used in plural), mob, pleb (used in plural), plebeian (used in plural), public, ruck, third estate.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عامَّة الناس او الجُمْهور
obyvatelstvo
befolkning
almúgi
gyventojai
iedzīvotājiļaudis

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊlɪs] N (gen) → pueblo m; (= mob) → populacho m, turba f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊləs] n
the populace → le peuple
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

populace

nBevölkerung f; (= masses)breite Öffentlichkeit; the populace of Romedas Volk von Rom, die Bürger von Rom
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊlɪs] npopolo, popolino
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

populace

(ˈpopjuləs) noun
the people (of a country etc).
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The lowest, cruelest, and worst populace of a city, never without its quantity of low, cruel, and bad, were the directing spirits of the scene: noisily commenting, applauding, disapproving, anticipating, and precipitating the result, without a check.
The priest whitewashes them, the archdeacon scrapes them down; then the populace arrives and demolishes them.
Once spirit was God, then it became man, and now it even becometh populace.
Mazarin shrugged his shoulders and pretended to despise the populace; but he turned visibly pale and ran to his closet, trembling all over, locked up his gold and jewels in his caskets and put his finest diamonds on his fingers.
"If your High Excellency will listen for a moment to the shouts of the exasperated populace--" ("of the exasperated populace!" the Sub-Warden repeated in a louder tone, as the Lord Chancellor, being in a state of abject terror, had dropped almost into a whisper) "--you will understand what it is they want.
The populace had come to witness an execution, and here was an opportunity offered them of performing one themselves.
Solon seems not to have altered the established form of government, either with respect to the senate or the mode of electing their magistrates; but to have raised the people to great consideration in the state by allotting the supreme judicial department to them; and for this some persons blame him, as having done what would soon overturn that balance of power he intended to establish; for by trying all causes whatsoever before the people, who were chosen by lot to determine them, it was necessary to flatter a tyrannical populace who had got this power; which contributed to bring the government to that pure democracy it now is.
Some few days after this memorable meeting of the Gun Club, the manager of an English company announced, at the Baltimore theatre, the production of "Much ado about Nothing." But the populace, seeing in that title an allusion damaging to Barbicane's project, broke into the auditorium, smashed the benches, and compelled the unlucky director to alter his playbill.
It seemed as though the Priests had no choice between submission and extermination; when suddenly the course of events was completely changed by one of those picturesque incidents which Statesmen ought never to neglect, often to anticipate, and sometimes perhaps to originate, because of the absurdly disproportionate power with which they appeal to the sympathies of the populace.
We sauntered through the markets and criticised the fearful and wonderful costumes from the back country; examined the populace as far as eyes could do it; and closed the entertainment with an ice-cream debauch.