popular sovereignty


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popular sovereignty

n
(Historical Terms) (in the pre-Civil War US) the doctrine that the inhabitants of a territory should be free from federal interference in determining their own domestic policy, esp in deciding whether or not to allow slavery

popular sovereignty

1. the doctrine that sovereign power is vested in the people and that those chosen by election to govern or to represent must conform to the will of the people.
2. U.S. History. a doctrine, held chiefly before 1865 by antiabolitionists, that new territories should be free of federal interference in domestic matters, especially concerning slavery.
See also: Politics
References in periodicals archive ?
Popular sovereignty is the principle that the authority of a state and its governments are created and sustained by the consent of its people, through their elected representatives.
Unfortunately, many polities that can claim to have upheld the principle of popular sovereignty to a much greater extent than Pakistan are also degenerating before our very eyes.
Saudi Arabia has expressed support for the protests in what many suspect is part of an effort to ensure that Sudan does not become a symbol of the power of popular sovereignty and its ability to defeat autocracy.
Douglas defended the concept of "popular sovereignty," whereby the people who resided in western territories should have the right to decide if slavery would be allowed.
Minister Kang also underlined the need for the overseas missions, agencies in close contact with the people, to do everything they could to protect the overseas Koreans and to reach closer to the people in a bid to conduct diplomacy in communication with people in the era of popular sovereignty.
The claim of British radical movements that they have the right to participate in issues of high politics has roots in 17th-century theories of direct democracy or popular sovereignty, says Hill.
When Buchanan became president, he was confronted with the question of slavery, the Dred Scott decision from the Supreme Court, and whether popular sovereignty would determine if new states allowed slavery.
While today's challenges may cast doubt on the validity of America's tradition of popular sovereignty, landmark statutes enacted as a result of the efforts of "We the People" have resulted in the expansion of voting rights, institution of fair housing laws, desegregation of schools, repeal of racial miscegenation laws, enactment of gay rights protections, and more.
The book centers on two premises: "First, that federalism and state sovereignty became near synonymous terms during the founding period" and second "that the idea of popular sovereignty at the time of the founding was not tied to the broader notion of a national popular sovereignty" (1).
He draws on competing factors such Americans' deep respect for popular sovereignty and the country's growing interdependence with the world to explain how the US went from undermining the League of Nations to building the post-WWII liberal international order to refusing to ratify even the most unthreatening treaties today.
"We managed to revive the history of popular sovereignty that had been initiated by the March 1 Independence Movement," he said.
Article 1 of the constitution states that sovereignty of the people or popular sovereignty is the principle that the authority of the government is created and sustained by the consent of the people through their elected representatives who are the source of all political power.