popularist


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popularist

(ˈpɒpjʊlərɪst)
adj
1. (Journalism & Publishing) designed for the general public; non-specialist; non-intellectual
2. (Broadcasting) designed for the general public; non-specialist; non-intellectual
Translations

popularist

[ˈpɒpjʊlərɪst] ADJpopularista
References in periodicals archive ?
A more popularist mode of feminist address is consistent with the language of postfeminism, which discusses ideas such as women's independence, empowerment and choice but does not explicitly reference feminism.
I know we have to build for long-term sustainability and not to be popularist and take short-term, crowd-pleasing decisions.
Indeed, 80% of Australian teachers are either unaware of the increasingly popularist notion of Education for Sustainability, or do not understand what it is (Australian Education for Sustainability Alliance, 2014).
The museum faced potential indirect censorship via the withdrawal of funding (something fought by the Brooklyn Museum in 1999 when Mayor Giuliani was outraged by the 'Sensation' exhibition); it also faced a (legally inaccurate) condemnation by a public figure attempting to tap in to assumed popularist sentiment.
Neither behind closed doors nor in popularist political announcements and not even in reliance on generous donors can our health network leap into the 21st century.
By the time the puzzle got to Ball (1892) the legend had become quite well embellished, and later, Gardner (1965), a popularist writer of mathematical puzzles and recreations, seemed to be confused about the story's details.
In contrast to earlier attempts to account for Browning's turn from the drama to the genre of the monologue, Fermanis contends that "like so many of his Romantic predecessors, [Browning] was interested in the popularist potential of the political drama" (55).
It was politically very popularist and they were happy to follow that," Mr Lawrence said.
The trouble is, popularist rantings are no basis for sound policy.
The failure of democratic experiments in Egypt, Iraq and elsewhere lead to the inevitable conclusion that in our complex and diverse societies a more robust political system is required which enshrines the rights of all citizens and guards against the sweeping to power of popularist but intolerant and socially regressive groups.
The council-sponsored event, which has been a big draw for Midlanders since 1991, is one of the town's cultural highlights of the year and has built up a reputation for putting a popularist spin on Shakespeare's works to make them accessible to a wide audience.