popularist


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popularist

(ˈpɒpjʊlərɪst)
adj
1. (Journalism & Publishing) designed for the general public; non-specialist; non-intellectual
2. (Broadcasting) designed for the general public; non-specialist; non-intellectual
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

popularist

[ˈpɒpjʊlərɪst] ADJpopularista
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Symbolic voting for popularist, far right politicians will echo the rise of fascism in 1930s Europe, said FUW president Glyn Roberts.
Our money is continually being directed into funding minority popularist schemes such as cycle tracks, dedicated bus routes, smart motorways etc., in preference to the more basic requirements of our less vociferous citizen majority.
In this article I focus on recent reporting on North Korea in the digital edition of a UK-owned mainstream news outlet Mail Online (the website of the widely read Daily Mail), which maintains a right-wing position characterized by reactive popularist journalism.
A more popularist mode of feminist address is consistent with the language of postfeminism, which discusses ideas such as women's independence, empowerment and choice but does not explicitly reference feminism.
Indeed, 80% of Australian teachers are either unaware of the increasingly popularist notion of Education for Sustainability, or do not understand what it is (Australian Education for Sustainability Alliance, 2014).
Neither behind closed doors nor in popularist political announcements and not even in reliance on generous donors can our health network leap into the 21st century.
By the time the puzzle got to Ball (1892) the legend had become quite well embellished, and later, Gardner (1965), a popularist writer of mathematical puzzles and recreations, seemed to be confused about the story's details.
In contrast to earlier attempts to account for Browning's turn from the drama to the genre of the monologue, Fermanis contends that "like so many of his Romantic predecessors, [Browning] was interested in the popularist potential of the political drama" (55).
It was politically very popularist and they were happy to follow that," Mr Lawrence said.
The trouble is, popularist rantings are no basis for sound policy.
The failure of democratic experiments in Egypt, Iraq and elsewhere lead to the inevitable conclusion that in our complex and diverse societies a more robust political system is required which enshrines the rights of all citizens and guards against the sweeping to power of popularist but intolerant and socially regressive groups.