populous

(redirected from populousness)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

populous

having many people; numerous; crowded
Not to be confused with:
populace – the common people; a population

pop·u·lous

 (pŏp′yə-ləs)
adj.
Containing many people or inhabitants; having a large population.

[Middle English, from Latin populōsus, from populus, the people; see popular.]

pop′u·lous·ly adv.
pop′u·lous·ness n.

populous

(ˈpɒpjʊləs)
adj
containing many inhabitants; abundantly populated
[C15: from Late Latin populōsus]
ˈpopulously adv
ˈpopulousness n

pop•u•lous

(ˈpɒp yə ləs)

adj.
1. containing many residents or inhabitants; heavily populated: a populous area.
2. jammed or crowded with people.
3. forming or comprising a large number or quantity; numerous.
[1400–50; late Middle English populus < Latin populōsus. See people, -ous]
pop′u•lous•ly, adv.
pop′u•lous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.populous - densely populated
inhabited - having inhabitants; lived in; "the inhabited regions of the earth"

populous

adjective populated, crowded, packed, swarming, thronged, teeming, heavily populated, overpopulated Indonesia is the fourth most populous country in the world.
Translations
مُزْدَحِم بالسُّكّان
lidnatý
folkerig
népes
òéttbÿll; margmennur
ľudnatý
kalabalaık

populous

[ˈpɒpjʊləs] ADJpopuloso
the most populous city in the worldla ciudad más populosa del mundo

populous

[ˈpɒpjʊləs] adj [city] → populeux/eusepop-up book nlivre m animé (avec pliages qui s'ouvrent)pop-up menu nmenu m (qui s'affiche à l'écran sur commande)

populous

adj countrydicht besiedelt; town, area alsomit vielen Einwohnern, einwohnerstark

populous

[ˈpɒpjʊləs] adjpopoloso/a, densamente popolato/a

populate

(ˈpopjuleit) verb
(usually in passive) to fill with people. That part of the world used to be populated by wandering tribes.
ˌpopuˈlation noun
the people living in a particular country, area etc. the population of London is 8 million; a rapid increase in population.
ˈpopulous adjective
full of people. a populous area.

population is singular: The population of the city increases in the summer .
References in classic literature ?
Natural as it is to be somewhat incredulous concerning the populousness of the more enormous creatures of the globe, yet what shall we say to Harto, the historian of Goa, when he tells us that at one hunting the King of Siam took elephants; that in those regions elephants are numerous as droves of cattle in the temperate climes.
Whoever considers the populousness and strength of several of these States singly at the present juncture, and looks forward to what they will become, even at the distance of half a century, will at once dismiss as idle and visionary any scheme which aims at regulating their movements by laws to operate upon them in their collective capacities, and to be executed by a coercion applicable to them in the same capacities.
There appears to be a tendency to extinction among all the savage nations; and this tendency would seem to have been in operation among the aboriginals of this country long before the advent of the white men, if we may judge from the traces and traditions of ancient populousness in regions which were silent and deserted at the time of the discovery; and from the mysterious and perplexing vestiges of unknown races, predecessors of those found in actual possession, and who must long since have become gradually extinguished or been destroyed.
By degrees the populousness of this encampment began to produce its inconveniences.
For owing to the populousness and wealth of the country, the droves of swine are exceedingly large, especially along the seacoast of the Tuscans: for one sow will bring up a thousand pigs, or sometimes even more.
David Hume is remembered for his Populousness of Ancient Nations [1752] along with Joaquin Faiguet de Villeneuve and Etienne-Noel Damilaville, author of the entry "Population" in the Encyclopedie.
Mumbai can terrorise you with its humidity and populousness. To escape, some of us were desperately searching for distractions.
Box and Silverthorne discuss Hume's essay "Of the Populousness of Antient Nations" and situate it within the contemporary debates over whether modem nations are depopulated relative to the ancients (an argument endorsed by Montesquieu, Isaac Vossius, and Robert Wallace).
Box and Michael Silverthrone examine Hume's essay, "Of the Populousness of Antient Nations," arguing that Hume's conclusions rest on a skeptical examination of the historical evidence and moral reasoning that fueled some of his skeptical conclusions.
Demolishing some obviousnesses--for example, that populousness is a good in itself--he continued to traffic in others: contraception is vice; sexual passion largely constant; desire heteronormative.