porker

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pork·er

 (pôr′kər)
n.
1. A fattened young pig.
2. Derogatory A fat person.

porker

(ˈpɔːkə)
n
(Agriculture) a pig, esp a young one weighing between 40 and 67 kg, fattened to provide meat such as pork chops

pork•er

(ˈpɔr kər, ˈpoʊr-)

n.
a pig, esp. one being fattened for its meat.
[1635–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porker - a pig fattened to provide meatporker - a pig fattened to provide meat  
pig, squealer, Sus scrofa, grunter, hog - domestic swine
Translations

porker

[ˈpɔːkəʳ] Ncerdo m, cochino m

porker

nMastschwein nt
References in classic literature ?
Sleek unwieldy porkers were grunting in the repose and abundance of their pens, from whence sallied forth, now and then, troops of sucking pigs, as if to snuff the air.
In the porkers he saw carved out the future sleek side of bacon, and juicy relishing ham; not a turkey but he beheld daintily trussed up, with its gizzard under its wing, and, peradventure, a necklace of savory sausages; and even bright chanticleer himself lay sprawling on his back, in a side dish, with uplifted claws, as if craving that quarter which his chivalrous spirit disdained to ask while living.
The hens, in turn, took it out on the little porkers, pecking them when they strayed too far from their mother.
The sleigh-bells jingled to and fro continually: sometimes announcing the arrival of a sleigh from Vermont, laden with the frozen bodies of porkers, or sheep, and perhaps a deer or two; sometimes of a regular market-man, with chickens, geese, and turkeys, comprising the whole colony of a barn yard; and sometimes of a farmer and his dame, who had come to town partly for the ride, partly to go a-shopping, and partly for the sale of some eggs and butter.
He finished off by squeaking so like a pig that the spectators thought that he had a porker concealed about him.
slowly and with upturned eyes ejaculated the trio, as, letting go their hold, the emancipated porker tumbled headlong among the Philistines, "El Emanu
Friend squire upstairs is at this moment no better than a porker.
Never mind, my lord," said the Baronet, "we'll try the porker on Saturday.
and I have often wishedbut it is so little one can venture to dosmall, trifling presents, of any thing uncommon Now we have killed a porker, and Emma thinks of sending them a loin or a leg; it is very small and delicateHartfield pork is not like any other porkbut still it is porkand, my dear Emma, unless one could be sure of their making it into steaks, nicely fried, as ours are fried, without the smallest grease, and not roast it, for no stomach can bear roast porkI think we had better send the leg do not you think so, my dear?
One young gentleman (a very delicate porker with several straws sticking about his nose, betokening recent investigations in a dung-hill) was walking deliberately on, profoundly thinking, when suddenly his brother, who was lying in a miry hole unseen by him, rose up immediately before his startled eyes, ghostly with damp mud.
At the same time, many authors are reporting that an increase in the live weight of porkers may be one of the factors which improve the quality of meat as well as limit the defects related to wateriness (Martin et al.
He said: "Essentially, we're a nation of lazy porkers.