porpentine


Also found in: Wikipedia.

porpentine

(ˈpɔːpənˌtaɪn)
n
(Animals) a literary word for porcupine
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Below: Peter Burr and Porpentine Charity Heartscape, Dirtscraper, 2018, three-channel interactive digital video, color, sound, indefinite duration.
This devious strategy further hollows the internal space of loss and separation, in an echoing effect, resounding the untold-though-hinted-at: "I could a tale unfold, whose lightest word/ Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, make thy two eyes like stars, start from their spheres, Thy knotty and combined locks to part,/ And each particular hair to stand an end,/ Like quills upon the fretful porpentine: But this eternal blazon must not be/ To ears of flesh and blood." (Shakespeare 2001: 48-49)
But he too feels the need to defend himself, 'to pull out a few of the spines that the friendly porpentine has discharged into me." (7) Like Henry James, Eliot knows that his interlocutor is unlikely to come around to a genuine understanding of what it is that he has sought to accomplish through his artistry.
"[...]; the sister, Mildred, was in Egypt, she soon informed Porpentine, to gather rock specimens, being daft for rocks in the same way Sir Alastair was for large and ancient pipe organs'.
Just a few short months ago, Colbert Porpentine was destined to become the leader of Worldshaker, a colossal ship the size of a city, but after the revolution in which the slave-laboring Filthies liberated the ship from the upper-class Swanks, Col has suddenly found himself unneeded and unwanted by the Filthies he helped set free.
But that I am forbid To tell the secrets of my prison house, I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes like stars start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part, And each particular hair to stand an end Like quills upon the fearful porpentine. (I.v.9-20) The ghost promises he could deliver a tale of such fantastic horror, it would "harrow up" Prince Hamlet's soul, "freeze" his blood, and transform him into a vision of stellar ghoulishness.
"Porpentine," for example, was a nearly irresistible indulgence--but since "porcupine" was metrically identical to "porpentine," and since Shakespeare would have opted for the contemporary term, I yielded to usage.
From the first page the author may have the reader hooked as the 'upper deck' Colbert Porpentine, future Supreme Commander of the juggernaut 'Worldshaker' encounters a 'Filthy' girl, Riff, from below who had escaped from being changed into a 'menial'.
But that I am forbid To tell the secrets of my prison-house, I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes like stars start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part, And each particular hair to stand on end Like quills upon the fretful porpentine [frightened porcupine] (I.v.13-20).
The tendency to identify one of the stage doors with the door to the Courtesan's house stems from the idea that this play would have been staged in a classical manner, with three marked houses: Antipholus's house (the Phoenix), the Courtesan's house (the Porpentine), and the Priory.
Indeed, these scenes suggest a particularly fraught intertwining of human bodies and animated objects, not only in the staging of the ghost, but n Hamlet s reference to his father's tomb opening "his ponderous and marble jaws" (1.4.50) or the ghost's image of eyes starting from heads and hairs standing up as quills "upon the fearful porpentine" (1.5.20).
Ralph Berry also notes a blurring of Ephesus and London in the sharing of names: the Phoenix and the Porpentine, the mixed currency of marks and pounds, guilders and sixpence; and when Dromio of Ephesus calls to be admitted to his "home," we hear not Ephesian but English names: "Maud, Bridget, Marian, Cic'ly, Gillian, Ginn!" (Berry 41-42; 3.1.31).