porphyrin


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por·phy·rin

 (pôr′fə-rĭn)
n.
Any of various organic compounds containing four pyrrole rings, occurring universally in protoplasm, and functioning as a metal-binding cofactor in hemoglobin, chlorophyll, and certain enzymes.

[Greek porphurā, purple dye, purple garment; see purple + -in.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

porphyrin

(ˈpɔːfɪrɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) any of a group of pigments occurring widely in animal and plant tissues and having a heterocyclic structure formed from four pyrrole rings linked by four methylene groups
[C20: from Greek porphura purple, referring to its colour]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

por•phy•rin

(ˈpɔr fə rɪn)

n.
a dark red, photosensitive pigment consisting of four pyrrole rings linked by single carbon atoms: a component of chlorophyll, heme, and vitamin B12.
[1905–10; < Greek porphýr(a) purple]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porphyrin - any of various pigments distributed widely in living tissues
pigment - dry coloring material (especially a powder to be mixed with a liquid to produce paint, etc.)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

por·phy·rin

n. porfirina, compuesto que ocurre en el protoplasma y que es la base de los pigmentos respiratorios en los animales y las plantas.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"Our formulation of manganese porphyrin was very well tolerated and resulted in a significant improvement of dry-eye disease pathology.
The optical and catalytic properties are based on one hand on porphyrin redox versatility and on the other hand on the redox chemistry of Co(II) that can be converted into a more nucleophilic Co(I) species by single-electron reduction process [19].
This talk presents a personal story of a three-time cancer survivor and how people have tried to fight back against cancer by studying the chemistry and anti-cancer biology of expanded porphyrins. Expanded porphyrin is a term we introduced into the literature in 1988 to describe larger homologues of natural blood pigments, such as the dyes (called heme) that make blood red.
In fact, amine ligants are very stable as axial ligants for most of the complexes that present in the equatorial plane a tetraazamacrocyclic ligand, as the case of porphyrin and chlorinic ligands [23].
Additionally, the fluorescence peak around 630 and 690 nm is attributed to porphyrin derivatives.
The rich self-assembling possibilities of hybrid plasmonic couples due to structural plasticity of porphyrin molecules lead to achieving the required optical properties to be used in plasmonic sensing of vitamins and pharmaceutical compounds [29].
There are three main fluorescence bands: at 480 nm (due to NADH), at 585 nm (due to basic porphyrin), and another at 630 nm (due to neutral porphyrin).
Bocian, "Spectroscopic characterization of porphyrin monolayer assemblies," Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol.
In this section, we discuss entropies of four familiar classes of dendrimers, namely, Porphyrin (Figure 1), Propyl ether imine (Figure 2), Zinc-Porphyrin (Figure 3), and Poly(EThyleneAmidoAmine) (Figure 4) Dendrimers.
Complex 1 was constructed from a frequently used porphyrin ligand mesotetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP, Figure 1), yttrium and potassium ions.
To produce hemoglobin, the body goes through a process called porphyrin synthesis, which mainly occurs in the liver and bone marrow.