porpoise

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por·poise

 (pôr′pəs)
n. pl. porpoise or por·pois·es
1. Any of various marine toothed whales of the genus Phocoena and related genera, characteristically having a blunt snout and a triangular dorsal fin. Porpoises are placed either in their own family, Phocoenidae, or with the dolphins in the family Delphinidae.
2. Any of several related aquatic mammals, such as the dolphins.

[Middle English porpeis, from Old French (probably translation of a Germanic compound meaning sea-pig) : porc, pig (from Latin porcus; see porko- in Indo-European roots) + peis, fish (from Latin piscis).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

porpoise

(ˈpɔːpəs)
n, pl -poises or -poise
1. (Animals) any of various small cetacean mammals of the genus Phocaena and related genera, having a blunt snout and many teeth: family Delphinidae (or Phocaenidae)
2. (Animals) (not in technical use) any of various related cetaceans, esp the dolphin
[C14: from French pourpois, from Medieval Latin porcopiscus (from Latin porcus pig + piscis fish), replacing Latin porcus marīnus sea pig]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

por•poise

(ˈpɔr pəs)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -poise, (esp. for kinds or species) -pois•es, n.
1. any of certain toothed cetaceans of the family Delphinidae having a blunt, rounded snout, esp. of the genus Phocoena, as the common porpoise, P. phocoena, of the Atlantic and Pacific. Compare dolphin.
v.i.
2. (of a speeding motorboat) to leap clear of the water after striking a wave.
3. (of a vehicle) to move forward with an alternately rising and falling motion.
[1275–1325; Middle English porpoys < Middle French porpois < Vulgar Latin *porcopiscis hog fish, for Latin porcus marīnus sea hog]
por′poise•like`, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

por·poise

(pôr′pəs)
Any of several small, toothed whales having a blunt snout and a triangular dorsal fin. Compare dolphin.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porpoise - any of several small gregarious cetacean mammals having a blunt snout and many teethporpoise - any of several small gregarious cetacean mammals having a blunt snout and many teeth
dolphin - any of various small toothed whales with a beaklike snout; larger than porpoises
harbor porpoise, herring hog, Phocoena phocoena - the common porpoise of the northern Atlantic and Pacific
Phocoena sinus, vaquita - a short porpoise that lives in the Gulf of California; an endangered species
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

porpoise

noun
Related words
collective nouns school, gam
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
دُلْفين، خَنْزير البَحْر
sviňucha
marsvin
pyöriäinen
hnísa
돌고래
jūrų kiaulė
jūrascūka, cūkdelfīns
morświn
sviňucha
domuz balığı

porpoise

[ˈpɔːpəs] N (porpoise or porpoises (pl)) → marsopa f, puerco m de mar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

porpoise

[ˈpɔːrpəs] nmarsouin m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

porpoise

nTümmler m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

porpoise

[ˈpɔːpəs] nfocena
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

porpoise

(ˈpoːpəs) noun
a type of blunt-nosed sea animal of the dolphin family.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
And another time a whole school of porpoises came dancing through the waves; and they too asked Polynesia if this was the ship of the fa- mous doctor.
(DAN, AGGRIEVED:--"Well, I'd never heard of porpoises and it sounded like something that grew.
In New Bedford, fathers, they say, give whales for dowers to their daughters, and portion off their nieces with a few porpoises a-piece.
Latitude and longitude, noon every day; and how many miles we made last twenty-four hours; and all the domino games I beat and horse billiards; and whales and sharks and porpoises; and the text of the sermon Sundays (because that'll tell at home, you know); and the ships we saluted and what nation they were; and which way the wind was, and whether there was a heavy sea, and what sail we carried, though we don't ever carry any, principally, going against a head wind always--wonder what is the reason of that?--and how many lies Moult has told--Oh, every thing!
"In a little time," she said, "you'll know where to swim to, but just now we'll follow Sea Pig, the Porpoise, for he is very wise." A school of porpoises were ducking and tearing through the water, and little Kotick followed them as fast as he could.
"Prove it," challenged the tall man, who we afterward learned was known as "The Porpoise" because of his wonderful swimming abilities.
"There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my tail.
What can be more curious than that the hand of a man, formed for grasping, that of a mole for digging, the leg of the horse, the paddle of the porpoise, and the wing of the bat, should all be constructed on the same pattern, and should include the same bones, in the same relative positions?
I saw there in the midst of this fire that burns not the swift and elegant porpoise
Nothing they wore in the way of clothing, but from around each of their necks he removed a necklace of porpoise teeth that was worth a gold sovereign in mere exchange value.
By the time we dragged him out of that, his madness had shifted to the belief that he was a great swimmer, and the next moment he was overboard and demonstrating his ability by floundering like a sick porpoise and swallowing much salt water.
One would have thought that Pinocchio had turned into a porpoise playing in the sun.