porridge

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Related to porridges: porridge oats

por·ridge

 (pôr′ĭj, pŏr′-)
n.
A soft food made by boiling oatmeal or another meal in water or milk.

[Alteration of pottage (influenced by obsolete porray, vegetable soup, from Middle English porreie, from Old French poree, leek soup, from por, leek, from Latin porrum).]

por′ridg·y adj.

porridge

(ˈpɒrɪdʒ)
n
1. (Cookery) a dish made from oatmeal or another cereal, cooked in water or milk to a thick consistency
2. slang a term in prison (esp in the phrase do porridge)
[C16: variant (influenced by Middle English porray pottage) of pottage]

por•ridge

(ˈpɔr ɪdʒ, ˈpɒr-)

n.
a thick cereal made esp. of oatmeal boiled in water or milk.
[1525–35; alter. of earlier poddidge, akin to pottage]

porridge

oatmeal
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porridge - soft food made by boiling oatmeal or other meal or legumes in water or milk until thickporridge - soft food made by boiling oatmeal or other meal or legumes in water or milk until thick
dish - a particular item of prepared food; "she prepared a special dish for dinner"
rolled oats, oatmeal - meal made from rolled or ground oats
hasty pudding - sweetened porridge made of tapioca or flour or oatmeal cooked quickly in milk or water
gruel - a thin porridge (usually oatmeal or cornmeal)
burgoo, oatmeal - porridge made of rolled oats
Translations
عَصِيدَةعَصيدَه
ovesná kaše
grødhavregrød
puuro
w
zabkása
hafragrautur
ポリッジ
포리지
avižinė košė
auzu biezputrabiezputra
ovsená kaša
ovsena kaša
gröt
อาหารเช้าที่ทำจากข้าวโอ๊ตที่ใส่น้ำหรือนม
yulaf ezmesiyulaf lâpası
cháo

porridge

[ˈpɒrɪdʒ]
A. N
1. (Culin) → avena f (cocida)atole m (Mex); (baby's) → papilla f
2. to do two years' porridge (Brit) → pasar dos años a la sombra
B. CPD porridge oats NPLcopos mpl de avena

porridge

[ˈpɒrɪdʒ] nporridge m

porridge

n (esp Brit) → Porridge m, → Haferbrei m; porridge oatsHaferflocken pl

porridge

[ˈpɒrɪdʒ] nporridge m

porridge

(ˈporidʒ) noun
a food made from oatmeal boiled in water or milk.

porridge

عَصِيدَة ovesná kaše grød Haferbrei πόριτζ gachas, mazamorra puuro flocons d’avoine w porridge ポリッジ 포리지 havermoutpap grøt kasza owsiana mingau, papa овсяная каша gröt อาหารเช้าที่ทำจากข้าวโอ๊ตที่ใส่น้ำหรือนม yulaf ezmesi cháo 麦片粥
References in classic literature ?
After this they arrived at the Satyr's home, and soon the Satyr put a smoking dish of porridge before him.
Piperson fetched meal from a chest and made porridge. It seemed to Pigling that something at the further end of the kitchen was taking a suppressed interest in the cooking, but he was too hungry to be troubled by noises.
She gave us breakfast--stiff oatmeal porridge without milk, and a boiled egg apiece.
Half-a-dozen dishes stood upon the shelves; the table was laid for supper with a bowl of porridge, a horn spoon, and a cup of small beer.
The contents of the pan began to boil, and he turned to plunge his hand into the bowl; I conjectured that this preparation was probably for our supper, and, being hungry, I resolved it should be eatable; so, crying out sharply, 'I'LL make the porridge!' I removed the vessel out of his reach, and proceeded to take off my hat and riding-habit.
Silas pressed it to him, and almost unconsciously uttered sounds of hushing tenderness, while he bethought himself that some of his porridge, which had got cool by the dying fire, would do to feed the child with if it were only warmed up a little.
The woman now called to them that supper was ready, so they gathered around the table and Dorothy ate some delicious porridge and a dish of scrambled eggs and a plate of nice white bread, and enjoyed her meal.
Ravenous, and now very faint, I devoured a spoonful or two of my portion without thinking of its taste; but the first edge of hunger blunted, I perceived I had got in hand a nauseous mess; burnt porridge is almost as bad as rotten potatoes; famine itself soon sickens over it.
The wife received them both very kindly, spread a long table, and gave them a large plate of porridge. The farmer was hungry, and ate with a good appetite; but Little Klaus could not help thinking of the delicious dishes of fish and roast meats and cakes which he knew were in the oven.
Into these bowls, Mrs Squeers, assisted by the hungry servant, poured a brown composition, which looked like diluted pincushions without the covers, and was called porridge. A minute wedge of brown bread was inserted in each bowl, and when they had eaten their porridge by means of the bread, the boys ate the bread itself, and had finished their breakfast; whereupon Mr Squeers said, in a solemn voice, 'For what we have received, may the Lord make us truly thankful!'--and went away to his own.
Glegg paused from his porridge and looked up, not with any new amazement, but simply with that quiet, habitual wonder with which we regard constant mysteries.
Poor Lisbeth was busy preparing her sons' breakfast, and their porridge was already steaming on the fire.