portal vein


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portal vein

n.
A vein that conducts blood from the digestive organs, spleen, pancreas, and gallbladder to the liver.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

portal vein

n
(Anatomy) any vein connecting two capillary networks, esp in the liver (hepatic portal vein)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

por′tal vein′


n.
a large vein conveying blood to the liver from the veins of the stomach, intestine, spleen, and pancreas.
[1835–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.portal vein - a short vein that carries blood into the liver
portal system - system of veins that carry blood from the abdominal organs to the liver
vein, vena, venous blood vessel - a blood vessel that carries blood from the capillaries toward the heart; "all veins except the pulmonary vein carry unaerated blood"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

portal vein

nPfortader f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

por·tal vein

n. vena porta, vena formada por varias ramas de venas que provienen de órganos abdominales.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(2017a) stated: "Starting at 5 weeks, the portal (right vitelline vein), portal sinus and umbilical veins (intrahepatic portion) sprouted portal vein branches that, at 6.5 weeks, have been pruned to 3 main branches inside the right hemi-liver, whereas all (>10) persisted in the left hemi-liver.
Portal vein reconstruction is the most important part of the surgery and portal vein complications can cause graft failure (2).
Patients were included in the study if they met the following criteria: diagnosed with cirrhosis of any etiology; aged 18-80 years; had a history of esophageal/gastric variceal bleeding and secondary hypersplenism; liver function Child-Pugh A or B; hypersplenism with a PLT count <100x[10.sup.9]/L; no portal vein system thrombosis proved by ultrasonographic evaluation on admission; underwent LSD; and completed a 3-month follow-up.
Portal vein and splenic artery, although appear to be lying at two ends of vascular spectrum, are intricately interconnected hemodynamically with the intra splenic arterial impedance showing an unexpected rise, correlating well with portal venous hypertension.
The left and right branches of the portal vein and intrahepatic portal venules were absent.
Portal vein embolization (PVE), chemotherapy, local ablation, and surgical portal vein ligation have been developed to induce liver tissue hypertrophy before major liver resection.
During the course of the entire research, Verhelst found that the liver involvement could be discrete and limited to vascular derangements on a microscopical level and may range to large direct shunts between the hepatic arteriolar branches and sinusoids (leading to arteriovenous shunts), between the portal vein and the central veins (portovenous shunts), and between the hepatic artery and the portal vein.
Color Doppler ultrasound revealed a monophasic turbulent venous flow pattern within the intrahepatic portal vein aneurysm.
Unexpectedly, augmented collaboration of the portal vein was demonstrated at the Calot triangle and the bed of the gallbladder during a laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) [Figure 1]a.
PoPH is a subset of pulmonary arterial hypertension, associated with portal hypertension (increased blood pressure in the portal vein) often due to cirrhosis.