portmanteau


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port·man·teau

 (pôrt-măn′tō, pôrt′măn-tō′)
n. pl. port·man·teaus or port·man·teaux (-tōz, -tōz′)
1. A large leather suitcase that opens into two hinged compartments.
2.
a. A word formed by merging the sounds and meanings of two different words, as chortle, from chuckle and snort. Also called portmanteau word.
b. A word or part of a word that is analyzable as consisting of more than one morpheme without a clear boundary between them, as French du "of the" from de "of" and le "the." Also called portmanteau morph.
adj.
General or generalized: a portmanteau description; portmanteau terms.

[French portemanteau : porte-, from porter, to carry (from Old French; see port5) + manteau, cloak (from Old French mantel, from Latin mantellum). N., senses 2a and b, in reference to Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass, in which Humpty Dumpty explains slithy and other made-up words in the poem "Jabberwocky" to Alice as follows: "Slithy" means "lithe and slimy" ... You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

portmanteau

(pɔːtˈmæntəʊ)
n, pl -teaus or -teaux (-təʊz)
1. (formerly) a large travelling case made of stiff leather, esp one hinged at the back so as to open out into two compartments
2. (modifier) embodying several uses or qualities: the heroine is a portmanteau figure of all the virtues. Also called: portmantle
[C16: from French: cloak carrier, from porter to carry + manteau cloak, mantle]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

port•man•teau

(pɔrtˈmæn toʊ, poʊrt-; ˌpɔrt mænˈtoʊ, ˌpoʊrt-)

n., pl. -teaus, -teaux (-toʊz, -toʊ; -ˈtoʊz, -ˈtoʊ)
adj. n.
1. Chiefly Brit. a case or bag to carry clothing in while traveling, esp. a leather trunk or suitcase that opens into two halves.
adj.
2. combining or blending several items, features, or qualities: a portmanteau show.
[1575–85; < French portemanteau literally, (it) carries (the) cloak; see port5, mantle]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.portmanteau - a new word formed by joining two others and combining their meanings; "`smog' is a blend of `smoke' and `fog'"; "`motel' is a portmanteau word made by combining `motor' and `hotel'"; "`brunch' is a well-known portmanteau"
motel - a motor hotel
neologism, neology, coinage - a newly invented word or phrase
brunch - combination breakfast and lunch; usually served in late morning
shopaholic - a compulsive shopper; "shopaholics can never resist a bargain"
workaholic - person with a compulsive need to work
smog, smogginess - air pollution by a mixture of smoke and fog
dandle - move (a baby) up and down in one's arms or on one's knees
2.portmanteau - a large travelling bag made of stiff leatherportmanteau - a large travelling bag made of stiff leather
suitcase, traveling bag, travelling bag, grip, bag - a portable rectangular container for carrying clothes; "he carried his small bag onto the plane with him"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
حقيبة سفر
голямкоженкуфар
چمدان
matkalaukku
waliza
va li

portmanteau

[pɔːtˈmæntəʊ]
A. N (portmanteaus, portmanteaux (pl)) [pɔːtˈmæntəʊz]baúl m de viaje
B. CPD portmanteau word Npalabra f combinada
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

portmanteau

n pl <-s or -x> → Handkoffer m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

portmanteau

[ˌpɔːtˈmæntəʊ] nbaule m portabiti
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
There was much to be done: his portmanteau to be packed, a credit to be got from the bank where he was a wealthy customer, and certain offices to be transacted for that other bank in which he was an humble clerk; and it chanced, in conformity with human nature, that out of all this business it was the last that came to be neglected.
After supper the portmanteau occupied D'Artagnan, he took a turn to the stable, patted his horse, and examined his shoes and legs, then, having counted over his money, he went to bed, sleeping as if only twenty, because he had neither inquietude nor remorse; he closed his eyes five minutes after he had blown out his lamp.
Flite!" Krook follows him with his eyes, and while he is calling, finds opportunity to steal to the old portmanteau and steal back again.
'Wait there, you dog,' returned the dwarf, 'to carry a bachelor's portmanteau. Pack it up, Mrs Quilp.
Pickwick proceeded to put himself into his clothes, and his clothes into his portmanteau. Great men are seldom over scrupulous in the arrangement of their attire; the operation of shaving, dressing, and coffee-imbibing was soon performed; and, in another hour, Mr.
But I saw her give her husband one look, as he staggered in with my comparatively light portmanteau, which she instantly snatched out of his feeble arms.
Franz, Bilibin's man, was dragging a portmanteau with some difficulty out of the front door.
He called to Samuel, through the window, to take his portmanteau up-stairs again, and he then put the key himself into Sergeant Cuff's hand.
I dropped my portmanteau at the turnpike when I got down--change of linen--genuine--honor bright-- more than fronts and wristbands; and with this suit of mourning, straps and everything, I should do you credit among the nobs here." Mr.
John, with the tall candlesticks in his hands, bowed them up to the fireplace; Hugh, striding in with a lighted brand and pile of firewood, cast it down upon the hearth, and set it in a blaze; John Grueby (who had a great blue cockade in his hat, which he appeared to despise mightily) brought in the portmanteau he had carried on his horse, and placed it on the floor; and presently all three were busily engaged in drawing out the screen, laying the cloth, inspecting the beds, lighting fires in the bedrooms, expediting the supper, and making everything as cosy and as snug as might be, on so short a notice.
Never once did he complain of the length or fatigue of a journey, never make an objection to pack his portmanteau for whatever country it might be, or however far away, whether China or Congo.
And now the portmanteau belonging to Mr Jones being put up in the baggage-cart, the forces were about to move forwards; when the guide, stepping up to Jones, said, "Sir, I hope you will consider that the horses have been kept out all night, and we have travelled a great ways out of our way." Jones was surprized at the impudence of this demand, and acquainted the soldiers with the merits of his cause, who were all unanimous in condemning the guide for his endeavours to put upon a gentleman.