References in classic literature ?
Turning over the volume, Laurence came to the portrait of a stern, grim- looking man, in plain attire, of much more modern fashion than that of the old Puritans.
Have you ever seen his portrait of Madame Vassiltchikova?
It was the first time that Philip set about a portrait, and he began with trepidation but also with pride.
Gavrila Ardalionovitch showed the general her portrait just now.
She pointed to a miniature portrait, hanging above the mantelpiece.
Now, by all odds, the most ancient extant portrait anyways purporting to be the whale's, is to be found in the famous cavern-pagoda of Elephanta, in India.
in what a monstrous moment of pride and passion he had prayed that the portrait should bear the burden of his days, and he keep the unsullied splendour of eternal youth
Edward Alleyn, from the portrait preserved at [78] his noble foundation at Dulwich, like a fine Holbein, figures, in blent strength and delicacy, as a genial, or perhaps jovial, soul, finding time for sentiment,--Prynne (included, we suppose, in this company, like the skull at the feast) as a likable if somewhat melancholic young man; while Garrick and his wife playing cards, after Zoffany, present a pair of just very nice young people.
This portrait attracted the Count of Monte Cristo's attention, for he made three rapid steps in the chamber, and stopped suddenly before it.
On the second morning after the departure of Nicholas for Yorkshire, Kate Nickleby sat in a very faded chair raised upon a very dusty throne in Miss La Creevy's room, giving that lady a sitting for the portrait upon which she was engaged; and towards the full perfection of which, Miss La Creevy had had the street-door case brought upstairs, in order that she might be the better able to infuse into the counterfeit countenance of Miss Nickleby, a bright salmon flesh- tint which she had originally hit upon while executing the miniature of a young officer therein contained, and which bright salmon flesh- tint was considered, by Miss La Creevy's chief friends and patrons, to be quite a novelty in art: as indeed it was.
Mr Twemlow takes his station on a settee before her, and Mrs Lammle shows him a portrait.
But look at me, count, look at me," said the prince endeavoring to direct upon himself the attention of the count, who was completely absorbed in contemplation of the portrait.