positivist


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pos·i·tiv·ism

 (pŏz′ĭ-tĭ-vĭz′əm)
n.
1. Philosophy
a. A doctrine contending that sense perceptions are the only admissible basis of human knowledge and precise thought.
b. The application of this doctrine in logic, epistemology, and ethics.
c. The system of Auguste Comte designed to supersede theology and metaphysics and depending on a hierarchy of the sciences, beginning with mathematics and culminating in sociology.
d. Any of several doctrines or viewpoints, often similar to Comte's, that stress attention to actual practice over consideration of what is ideal: "Positivism became the 'scientific' base for authoritarian politics, especially in Mexico and Brazil" (Raymond Carr).
2. The state or quality of being positive.

pos′i·tiv·ist, pos′i·tiv·is′tic adj.
pos′i·tiv·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.positivist - someone who emphasizes observable facts and excludes metaphysical speculation about origins or ultimate causes
nonreligious person - a person who does not manifest devotion to a deity
logical positivist - someone who maintains that any statement that cannot be verified empirically is meaningless
Adj.1.positivist - of or relating to positivism; "positivist thinkers"; "positivist doctrine"; "positive philosophy"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

positivist

[ˈpɒzɪtɪvɪst]
A. ADJpositivista
B. Npositivista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

positivist

[ˈpɒzɪtɪvɪst] npositiviste m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

positivist

nPositivist(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Organized into five chapters, the text begins by problematizing the use of positivist methods in sociocultural inquiry, specifically, the protocols of natural sciences that "authorize coders to isolate facts from their individually meaningful contexts and then throw these bits into an independent diagram that challenges our imagination" (p.
This Article argues against a positivist view of international environmental law that (i) conceives of states as unitary entities that speak with one voice in pursuit of a single national interest, (1) and that focuses on (ii) authoritative sources of law and (iii) the binding force of these sources of law.
While my entry point is from the perspective of a (mostly) quantitative researcher who is (loosely) in the "positivist" tradition (i.e., the application of scientific methods to social phenomena in order to identify generalizable, verifiable, replicable, and falsifiable causal relationships), I compare and contrast this approach with both "critical studies" (i.e., research designed to illuminate and challenge social, economic, political, and cultural structures and processes of domination and subordination) and "cultural studies" (i.e., research designed to uncover the ways in which meaning is inferred on and from the artifacts and experiences of everyday life).
This Article aims to fill that gap by revisiting the intellectual context in which the entrapment defense arose and, in particular, by linking the doctrine's development to the contributions and arguments of positivist criminology.
The Positivist, Pompous, Polite, Plum Environment of the Literary Milieu in America Philip Larkin Reviewed by Paul Muldoon in the New York Times
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The text avoids leading anti-imperialist MPs and pays much more attention to the contribution of Positivist and socialist thinkers.
The positivist approach to explaining law looks at first quite plausible: to know how to decide a case we must first identify the legal norm that governs the case, and to know that we need to know how to identify legal norms in general.
The court could be seen as adopting a positivist conception of international law, in which it mechanically interpreted article 51 of the United Nations Charter.
Gibson analyzes Italian prisons between unification and World War I, when the new Italian state developed a hybrid prison system based primarily on positivist principles, but also incorporated characteristics from its Catholic and Enlightenment past.
The challenge to the positivist epistemology was undertaken during the course of the third great debate in IR.
The positivist approach to heritage is grounded in the historic fabric of a building, and privileges the building as an object.