positivism

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Related to positivists: Logical positivists

pos·i·tiv·ism

 (pŏz′ĭ-tĭ-vĭz′əm)
n.
1. Philosophy
a. A doctrine contending that sense perceptions are the only admissible basis of human knowledge and precise thought.
b. The application of this doctrine in logic, epistemology, and ethics.
c. The system of Auguste Comte designed to supersede theology and metaphysics and depending on a hierarchy of the sciences, beginning with mathematics and culminating in sociology.
d. Any of several doctrines or viewpoints, often similar to Comte's, that stress attention to actual practice over consideration of what is ideal: "Positivism became the 'scientific' base for authoritarian politics, especially in Mexico and Brazil" (Raymond Carr).
2. The state or quality of being positive.

pos′i·tiv·ist, pos′i·tiv·is′tic adj.
pos′i·tiv·ist n.

positivism

(ˈpɒzɪtɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) a strong form of empiricism, esp as established in the philosophical system of Auguste Comte, that rejects metaphysics and theology as seeking knowledge beyond the scope of experience, and holds that experimental investigation and observation are the only sources of substantial knowledge. See also logical positivism
2. (Law) Also called: legal positivism the jurisprudential doctrine that the legitimacy of a law depends on its being enacted in proper form, rather than on its content. Compare natural law3
3. the quality of being definite, certain, etc
ˈpositivist n, adj
ˌpositivˈistic adj
ˌpositivˈistically adv

pos•i•tiv•ism

(ˈpɒz ɪ təˌvɪz əm)

n.
1. the state or quality of being positive.
2. a philosophical system concerned with positive facts and phenomena, and excluding speculation upon ultimate causes or origins.
[1850–55]
pos′i•tiv•ist, adj., n.
pos`i•tiv•is′tic, adj.

positivism

1. a philosophical system developed by Auguste Comte, concerned with positive facts and phenomena, the flrst verifled by the methods of the empirical sciences, the second explainable by scientific laws. Also called Comtism.
2. a contemporary philosophical movement stressing the task of philosophy as criticizing and analyzing science, and rejecting all transcendental metaphysics. Also called logical positivism. — positivist, n.positivistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

positivism

A philosophical doctrine that we can only have knowledge of things we experience through the senses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.positivism - the form of empiricism that bases all knowledge on perceptual experience (not on intuition or revelation)
empiricism, empiricist philosophy, sensationalism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge derives from experience
Comtism - Auguste Comte's positivistic philosophy that metaphysics and theology should be replaced by a hierarchy of sciences from mathematics at the base to sociology at the top
2.positivism - a quality or state characterized by certainty or acceptance or affirmation and dogmatic assertiveness
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
assertiveness, self-assertiveness - aggressive self-assurance; given to making bold assertions
Translations

positivism

[ˈpɒzɪtɪvɪzəm] Npositivismo m

positivism

[ˈpɒzɪtɪvɪzəm] npositivisme m

positivism

nPositivismus m

positivism

[ˈpɒzɪtɪvɪzm] npositivismo
References in periodicals archive ?
For positivists, reality is a concrete and objective structure that is external to the researcher and open to being reduced to explanatory (independent) and dependent variables via laws that express their relationship.
It addresses positivist and naturalist validity, principles and rules, natural and legal rights, concepts of justice, and liberty and the legal enforcement of morality; issues of substantive jurisprudence such as the legal concepts and theories advanced by naturalists and positivists; the various socio-legal theories that view law as a central social phenomenon and the principle of utility; and applied jurisprudence to principles of law and practical concepts.
For almost 20 years Brazilian researchers have been stating the need of specific guidelines for SSH, because guidelines based on biomedical research, specifically based on paradigms positivists, are not adequate for all fields.
International legal positivists generally argue that there is a strict separation of law and morality, with no role for moral obligation in the validation of law.
As I learned from E[currency]E-krE- Hanioy-lu, the distinguished professor of late Ottoman history at Princeton University, Turkey's positivists also flirted for a while with the idea of naming their association the Committee of Order and Progress instead of the Committee of Union and Progress (CUP).
This approach to social inquiry tended to be qualitative rather than quantitative and was opposed by positivists who stressed external, experimental and quantitative knowledge.
In other words, positivist scholars understand the norms of Law are legal independently of their being just (morality) or legitimate (political conscience of the subject subordinated to it); legal positivists differentiate the validity of norms from the evaluation of their content.
Yet--similar to how Freud failed to see the effects of socio-historical conditions on our psychic lives--the positivists failed to see their effect on science more generally.
These instances of regulation exhibit the facilitative functions of Fuller's jurisprudential theory and do not have the kinds of binding effect that some positivists would understand to be a necessary feature of all law, including international law.
But these are issues of debate for cultural or critical studies scholars and positivists alike.
The classical predecessors of the positivists, beginning with eighteenth-century reformers like Cesare Beccaria and Jeremy Bentham, sought to eliminate barbarism and irregularity from the administration of criminal justice; their project was the development of a rational, systematic, and proportional means of delivering justice through law.
positivism) differences profound enough that led positivists to abandon it, postpositivists to include subjectivism into their methods, and acceptance of qualitative methods as a valid mode of scientific inquiry (Leibert, 2012).