possessive adjective


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Related to possessive adjective: possessive pronoun, Demonstrative adjective

possessive adjective

n.
A pronominal adjective expressing possession.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the analysed substantives, every single noun derives its possessive adjective.
That same possessive adjective is repeated at each subsequent station, where new arrivals on the train are welcomed to "their" 0855 train, taking precedence over the buffet ("no trolley service in Standard Class due to staff shortages") and even over apologies for the lateness of the service (rarely, in truth, on recent journeys).
The possessive here works like an adjective and is sometimes called a possessive adjective or a determiner.
Stating that Euzal avoided using hateful discourse against any person or community, Alptemocin said that Euzal tried not to use the possessive adjective "my" and preferred to use "our" while speaking because he thought that the country belongs to everybody living in it, not to a particular community, party or religion.
Coining a few simple gender-neutral pronouns would eliminate the need to use two pronouns or possessive adjectives in the alternative--her or she, him or her, his or hers, and his or her--when one pronoun or possessive adjective should suffice as a referent to either a female or male noun or owner.
Vocatives may in turn be strengthened with the addition of the possessive adjective my and (on occasion) of a qualifying adjective.
Inverse binding (extension of the binding domain) appears to be possible in (5) featuring an anaphor occurring as a complement of a noun (historie o sobie 'stories about -self') but not in (15) in which the anaphor takes the form of a possessive adjective (swoje siostry 'her own sisters').
cases of direct reader address in English (the pronoun you used as subject and non-subject, the possessive adjective your, and imperatives) and their translation into Spanish and Catalan;
It cannot be anything other than a possessive adjective, surely?
4/5 There shall be no systematic substitution of the masculine pronoun or possessive adjective to refer to God, in correspondence to the original text.
and of the reflexive possessive adjective (meus, tuus, suus, etc.