possessive case


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Related to possessive case: objective case
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.possessive case - the case expressing ownership
oblique, oblique case - any grammatical case other than the nominative
attributive genitive, attributive genitive case - a word in the genitive case that is used as an attributive adjective; "an example of the attributive genetive is `John's' in `John's mother'"
Translations

possessive case

n (Gram) → Genitiv m, → zweiter Fall
References in periodicals archive ?
In Leyte, Duterte dared the US to "fire the first shot" at China while he and "his" (possessive case) soldiers bring up the rear.
Another common misuse are the words there (a pronoun introducing a sentence or clause), they're (a contraction of the words they and are) and their (a possessive case of the pronoun they).
In some situations, you may choose either the objective case to emphasize the pronoun or you may choose the possessive case to emphasize the gerund (verb plus -ing).
As Kocher dutifully and poetically points out, the "Possessive case for the word 'slave' does not exist in Italian." One language is not enough for what the collection accomplishes in the most severe but understated way.
Dative is also marked as 'possessive case' in Komi language (CK [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] 1955 : 141).
: a mark ' used to show that letters or figures are missing (as in "can't" for "cannot" or "'76" for "1776") or to show the possessive case (as in "Mike's") or the plural of letters or figures (as in "cross your t's")
Remember the issue of making "Arkansas's" the correct way to write the state's possessive case?
Dr Winkler's research revealed that successful books all contained metaphorical, or figurative titles instead of literal ones; the first word was a pronoun, a verb, an adjective or a greeting; and their grammar patterns took the form either of a possessive case with a noun, or of an adjective and noun or of the words The ...
The reader is continually distracted by a tangle of tenses and the personification of inanimate objects with inappropriate use of the possessive case. There is 'the village's south', 'the hill's red earth', 'the regime's support base', 'the operation's progress', 'the camp's protection force'; all in just the first few pages.
What may be detected today, in the titles of churches dedicated not to mysteries in the life of Our Lord or the Virgin Mary but to individual saints, is a trend to eliminate the troublesome apostrophe by jettisoning what is popularly called the possessive case.
14 The greed of the possessive case in the tragedies of Sophocles.
("It's a lovely day.") Without an apostrophe, it is the possessive case - just like "his" or "her".