possessive pronoun


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possessive pronoun

n.
One of several pronouns designating possession and capable of substituting for noun phrases.
Translations
pronom possessiu
Possessivpronomenbesitzanzeigende Fürwort
pronombre posesivo
possessiivipronomini
birtokos névmás
eignarfornafn
pronomen possessivum
savybinis įvardis
zaimek dzierżawczy
pronome possessivo
possessivt pronomen

possessive pronoun

References in classic literature ?
Smallweed's favourite adjective of disparagement is so close to his tongue that he begins the words "my dear friend" with the monosyllable "brim," thus converting the possessive pronoun into brimmy and appearing to have an impediment in his speech.
Mr Tordoff had seen many items on the Schedule in the possession of the Bankrupt and gave evidence, which Mrs Tordoff confirmed, that the Bankrupt had indicated to him that he owned each of them by using the possessive pronoun and saying "I own it".
We can also use the possessive pronoun in the subject position.
The first one is a subject pronoun and the second is possessive pronoun.
The topics include accounting for analyticity in creoles, nothing will come of nothing, the complexity of the personal and possessive pronoun system of Norf'k, what defies complete acquisition in second language acquisition, and syntactical and variational complexity in British and Ghanaian English.
You know, the none so subtle put down questioning whether one who has lived long decades in Bahrain can possibly claim to use the plural possessive pronoun 'we', when airing views about perceived shortcomings.
People who don't know the difference between "less" and "few", who don't know when to use "I" and "me", and put a misplaced apostrophe in the possessive pronoun "its".
But while the musical centers on the Fair Lady, the title not only includes the possessive pronoun My, anchoring the perspective with Higgins, but also echoes the alarming nursery rhyme about London bridges falling down.
His use of the possessive pronoun, "my," and his words, "I believe," on page 58 of the article indicate that the conclusions he draws are his opinion.
The article is organized as follows: an Inventory of the pronouns in Akebu, Subject pronouns, Object pronoun, Possessive pronoun, Reflexive pronouns, Indefinitive pronouns, Demonstrative pronouns, Relative pronouns, Wh- words and Wh-phrases, Imperative, Request forms, Logophorics.
The preference for considering body part nouns to be inalienable can be seen, among other languages, on the example of Croatian, in which the use of the possessive pronoun with a noun referring to a body part is much less common than omitting the possessor altogether, as illustrated by the examples in Matasovic (2002: 154): Slomio sam nogu 'I broke the leg' sounds much more natural than Slomio sam svoju nogu 'I broke my leg'.