post-bellum


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post-bellum

(ˈpəʊstˈbɛləm)
adj
(prenominal) of or during the period after a war, esp the American Civil War
[C19: Latin post after + bellum war]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Although reflecting the post-bellum struggles, compromises and power calculations of the elite in the Coalition Government, Kenya's 2010 Constitution was a tour de force in setting the contours of the Kenyan brand for the 21st century.
As Lause argues, the western extension of the battle between corporations and their workers that emerged in the post-bellum era is a natural, albeit relatively untouched area for labour and working class historians to investigate.
The Hall Book of Grantham illustrates the largely untapped richness of English archives in revealing the complexities of a post-bellum town in the seventeenth century.
THE JULY 4 Inquirer featured a book, titled 'Accra and the Post-Bellum Bar' by Nick Joaquin (Lifestyle Arts and Books), about the rise to prominence of five lawyers: Edgardo Angara, Jose Concepcion, Avelino Cruz, Teodoro Regala and Manuel Abello (order rearranged to fit the acronym).
His vision was refracted through a prism that produced a spectrum broad enough for films about war (The Steel Helmet, Fixed Bayonets, Merrill's Marauders, and his masterpiece, The Big Red One), the post-bellum West (I Shot Jesse James, The Baron of Arizona, Forty Guns, Run of the Arrow), crime (Pickup on South Street, Underworld U.S.A, The Naked Kiss), racial differences (The Crimson Kimono, House of Bamboo, as well as The Steel Helmet).
Fuller's presence in the movement is almost omnipresent; even her absence is a kind of presence, which Katherine Adams claims may be "most significant to a study of black post-bellum women's reform writing" (406).
Synopsis: The practice of plural marriage, commonly known as polygamy, stirred intense controversy in post-bellum America until 1890, when the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints first officially abolished the practice.
This meant that the police could arrest anyone they saw as a threat to "order." In the post-bellum South, they enforced white supremacy, and largely arrested black people on trumped-up charges in order to feed them into convict labor systems.
While the entries contain information about events ante- and post-bellum, the heart of the content concerns the war years.
Shedding much light on the career of one of the post-bellum South's more interesting figures, this book is an important contribution to scholarship on the role of Jews during the Civil War and Reconstruction periods.
Divided into four sections, Teaching Nineteenth-Century American Poetry opens with a group of essays that focus on a representative selection of the subgenres of nineteenth-century poetry, including American Indian poetry, the sorrow songs, erotic poetry, working-class poetry, Civil War poetry, post-bellum realist poetry, and the schoolroom poets.
Unlike his Pollyannaish paeans to the glories of individualism, in this essay Whitman confesses his concerns about the "appalling dangers of universal suffrage in the United States." He describes post-bellum US society as sailing "a dangerous sea of seething currents and undercurrents" tossed and turned by the "blind fury of parties, infidelity, (an) entire lack of first-class captains and leaders, (and the) plentiful meanness and vulgarity of the ostensible masses." Whitman warned against Americans thinking that politics and policy were the sole foundations of a strong democracy.

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