post-feminist


Also found in: Wikipedia.

post-fem·i·nist

 (pōst′fĕm′ə-nĭst)
adj.
Relating to a period or culture in which the feminism of the 1960s and 1970s is seen as largely irrelevant to the current situation, often because that movement is seen as having accomplished its social and political goals or because it is seen as discredited.

post-feminism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

post-feminist

Arising out of feminism and developing feminist ideas further.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
She's published a collection of short stories (called Evil, Black Hole Press), and she contributed a learned post-feminist dissection of the old murder ballad "Pretty Polly" for The Rose and the Briar (W.
It is not that I feel that all the important achievements are the ones behind us--as the bumper sticker pinned above my desk reads: I'll be a post-feminist in post-patriarchy.
"Any woman who calls herself a post-feminist should keep her
During the Hillary-as-woman versus Obama-as-black runoff last year, the Times even wrote about how the Obama campaign was pitching its candidate as a "post-feminist." I think it was sort of sexist that they even pointed out he is a man.
Describing She Puppet as a potentially "post-feminist treatment" of popular iconography, Wees does what few other contributors dare to do: He acknowledges the murky business of assigning or denying feminism to an artistic object and/or authorial perspective.
Hague adopts a post-feminist take on events: pointing out that not only did Lloyd George draw sustenance and strength from [the two women], but that they in turn accepted that heartache was a price worth paying to be part of such a remarkable man's life'.
The story focuses on "post-feminist" sexologists whose studies are discovering supposedly surprising findings, though you may disagree.
Works such as these demonstrate not so much "post-feminist" sympathies, but something more in keeping with Amelia Jones's notion of "parafeminism," which explains the juxtaposition of documentary installations like Vaginal Davis's Present Penicative (2007) and Susanne Lacy and Leslie Labowitz's Restricted Access (2008).
Pendle's insistence on the idea of making feminist writings available for feminists is a welcome one in what can seem like a vehemently post-feminist world in which the very word 'feminist' is one to be avoided.
By Susan Reimer "The Dangerous Book for Boys", a nostalgic kind of Boy Scout manual, was such a sensation that it was bound to create a publishing genre.The book by brothers Conn and Hal Iggulden has sold more than 1.4 million copies and spawned all sorts of copycat books that celebrate the joys of a simpler, more rough-and-tumble boyhood.The obvious question was, what about the girls?Philadelphia authors Andrea Buchanan and Miriam Peskowitz responded with "The Daring Book for Girls," a kind of post-feminist guide to a tomboy girlhood that's not afraid to answer the question, "How do you walk in high heels?"The book, with a "Today" show launch on Halloween and a 600,000 first printing, is going to be a sensation, too.After all, girls read more books than boys.
In 1982, the New York Times Magazine ran an article entitled 'Voices from the Post-Feminist Generation'.

Full browser ?