postcard


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post·card

also post card  (pōst′kärd′)
n.
1. A printed card with space on one side for an address and a postage stamp, used for sending a short message through the mail.

postcard

(ˈpəʊstˌkɑːd)
n
a card, often bearing a photograph, picture, etc, on one side, (picture postcard), for sending a message by post without an envelope. Also called (US): postal card

post′card`

or post′ card`,


n.
1. a small, commercially printed card usu. having a picture on one side and space for a postage stamp, address, and message on the other.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.postcard - a card for sending messages by post without an envelopepostcard - a card for sending messages by post without an envelope
card - a rectangular piece of stiff paper used to send messages (may have printed greetings or pictures); "they sent us a card from Miami"
lettercard - a postcard that folds so the message is inside
picture postcard - a postcard with a picture on one side
Translations
بِطَاقَةٌ بَرِيدِيَّةبِطاقَه بريدِيَّه
пощенска
pohlednicedopisnicepohled
postkort
کارت پستال
postikortti
razglednica
képeslappostai levelezőlap
Kartu pos
póstkort
葉書郵便はがき
우편엽서
cartão postalcartão-postalpostal
razglednicadopisnica
vykort
โปสการ์ด
bưu thiếp

postcard

[ˈpəʊstkɑːd] N(tarjeta f) postal f

postcard

[ˈpəʊstkɑːrd] ncarte postale

postcard

[ˈpəʊstˌkɑːd] ncartolina (postale)

post2

(pəust) noun
(the system of collecting, transporting and delivering) letters, parcels etc. I sent the book by post; Has the post arrived yet?; Is there any post for me?
verb
to send (a letter etc) by post. He posted the parcel yesterday.
ˈpostage (-tidʒ) noun
(the money paid for) the sending of a letter etc by post. The postage was $1.20.
ˈpostal adjective
of, or concerning, the system of sending letters etc. the postal service.
postage stamp
a small printed label fixed to a letter, parcel etc to show that postage has been paid.
postal order
a printed document bought at a post office, which can be exchanged at another post office for the amount of money paid for it.
postbox (ˈpəusboks) noun
(also ˈletterbox, ~ˈmailbox, ~pillar box) a box into which letters etc are put to be collected (and sent to their destination).
postcard (ˈpəuskaːd) noun
a card on which a message may be sent by post, often with a picture on one side (a picture postcard). She sent me a postcard of the Taj Mahal when she was in India.
postcode (ˈpəuskoud) noun
(American zip code) a set of letters and numbers added to the address on a letter to make delivery easier.
ˌpost-ˈfree adjective, adverb
without charge for sending by post. You can send it post-free.
ˌpost(-)ˈhaste adverb
very quickly. He travelled post(-)haste to London.
postman (ˈpəusmən) noun
(American ˈmailman) a person whose job is to (collect and) deliver letters etc. Has the postman been this morning yet?
postmark (ˈpəusmaːk) noun
a mark put on a letter at a post office, showing the date and place of posting, and cancelling the postage stamp. The postmark read `Beirut'.
postmaster (ˈpəusmaːstə) feminine postmistress (ˈpəusmistris) noun
the manager of a post office.
post office
an office for receiving and dispatching letters, parcels etc. Where is the nearest post office?

postcard

بِطَاقَةٌ بَرِيدِيَّة pohlednice postkort Postkarte καρτ ποστάλ postal postikortti carte postale razglednica cartolina 郵便はがき 우편엽서 briefkaart postkort pocztówka cartão postal, postal почтовая открытка vykort โปสการ์ด kartpostal bưu thiếp 明信片
References in classic literature ?
As they came south, Helen retreated over the Brenner, and wrote an unsatisfactory postcard from the shores of the Lake of Garda, saying that her plans were uncertain and had better be ignored.
Mildred sent him a postcard to announce her safe arrival, and he snatched half an hour every day to write a long letter to her.
You could not get away from hearing of him wherever you were; his portrait was on every other postcard; his maps and battles in every other illustrated paper; songs in his honour in every other music-hall turn or on every other barrel-organ.
Those who knew him will recognize in my third act the allusion to the patent Shorthand in which he used to write postcards, and which may be acquired from a four and six-penny manual published by the Clarendon Press.
It was this figure that her husband saw when, having reached the polished Sphinx, having entangled himself with a man selling picture postcards, he turned; the stanza instantly stopped.
A promotional postcard of the Titanic before tragedy struck
Time was, when both for business or pleasure, the postcard and Royal Mail provided the default form of communication.
All the images come from an album of Donald McGill's postcards, sold by The Canterbury Auction Galleries for PS250.
Cooper, a novelist, auctioneer, antiques dealer, and curator who writes about art and antiques, collects about 300 postcards from the British Museum designed by modern and contemporary artists like Carl Andre, Eleanor Antin, Joseph Beuys, Tacita Dean, Gilbert & George, Richard Hamilton, Susan Hiller, Richard Long, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Dieter Roth, Gavin Turk, Mark Wallinger, Rachel Whiteread, and Hannah Wilke from the 1960s on, focusing on postcards as works of art rather than reprinted images of other artworks.
She adds: "Postcard collecting began in Victorian times, when they were invented, with 1900-01 being the golden age when millions were produced.
Postcardly puts whatever you write onto the back of a postcard (up to about 100 words), and whatever picture you want onto the front of the postcard.
On the back of 1908 postcard showing Durham Road, Low Fell, one person from Birtley writes to Mr William Jackson in Manchester: "Dear cousens (sic), got home all right and we all feel very canny..."