postcollegiate

(redirected from postcollege)

postcollegiate

(ˌpəʊstkəˈliːdʒɪət) or

postcollege

adj
(Education) education denoting something that takes place after college or among those that are no longer at college
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Collecting better demographic, learning, and outcomes data (such as completion rates and postcollege earnings) is essential to determining which types of students should be encouraged to enroll in CBE programs.
It didn't last very long and players were soon again without a postcollege league.
values and career identity, postcollege adjustment, ambivalent aspects
We note that although the issue of how students pay for their financial need is important because of potential postcollege consequences, the adequacy of grant aid and its impact on enrollment is a key, but separate, aspect of financial aid policy that our study focuses on.
In the wage regressions, rather than using the indicator for whether the position requires a college degree, I use the educational attainment (college or postcollege, with less than college serving as the reference group) of the most recently hired worker.
Her audience, mainly college and postcollege women, has grown so large that she routinely nets mainstream-media headlines and big-hall dates despite, and often because of, her outspoken political beliefs and sexual preferences.
The show's title is a reference to the fact that over the course of the series, viewers leap back and forth between the three time periods in order to observe the evolution of the group of sophisticated New Yorkers whom we meet in 1993, postcollege, at a lively East Village party thrown by Athena Barnes (Michelle Hurd), an aspiring actress.
In his postcollege years, Gonsalves worked full-time as an architect and in his spare time painted trompe l'oeil murals, theater sets, and other projects.
Findings indicate that college influenced postcollege literacy by building confidence in literate skills missing from previous schooling, by exposing these women to technology and other life skills, and by moving them "from a passive to an active role...to see themselves as an instrument of knowledge and influence." In addition, these women affected their children's education, though not as predicted, and achieved the hopes that first motivated their attending college.
The five (mutually exclusive and exhaustive) school-leaving groups defined in this article are high school dropouts, high school graduates, those with some college, college graduates, and those with some postcollege education.
The few studies examining postcollege activities found that first-generation college students choose occupations as diverse as those of their peers and make similar salaries (Choy, 2001).