postcolonial


Also found in: Wikipedia.

post·co·lo·ni·al

 (pōst′kə-lō′nē-əl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being the time following the establishment of independence in a colony: postcolonial economics.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Philosophical Foundations of the African Humanities Through Postcolonial Perspectives
In Post Colonial Thought and Social Theory, Go presents a postcolonial challenge to social theory and sociology's understanding of the social.
Analyzing a wide array of literatures from Africa, India, the Caribbean, Pacific islands, Australia, New Zealand, and from Chicano people, Ashcroft examines utopianism in the Blochian sense (as the hope impulse) in postcolonial contexts.
One of the problems that have envisaged postcolonial Nigeria is colonialism, British colonial administration was structured to exploit the human and natural resources of their formal colonies.
In the process of applying the theories of postcolonial studies to a famous author, such as Jorge Luis Borges, one needs to proceed with caution.
KARACHI -- Habib University's third Postcolonial Higher Education Conference highlights the specific historical and educational challenges of the postcolonial world, under the theme, 'The Inheritance of Injustice'.
Is their experience and literature comparable to that of overseas postcolonial countries?
Some scholars suggest that postcolonial studies is being eclipsed by globalization studies and others advocate for interdiscursive approaches so as to go "beyond a certain kind of postcolonial studies" (Lomba, Kaul, Bunzl, Burton, Esty 7).
Evangelical Postcolonial Conversations: Global Awakenings in Theology and Praxis.
Drawing on an engagement with Botswana that dates to the mid-1970s and a theoretical perspective informed by Deleuze and Guattari and Foucault, Ornulf Gulbrandsen attributes the consolidation of a strong postcolonial state in Botswana to the successful assimilation by indigenous authority power structures of various social forces that had the potential to threaten their hegemony.