postcrash

postcrash

(ˌpəʊstˈkræʃ)
adj
of, relating to, or occurring in the period after a crash
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Add to this a postcrash regulatory environment that made life harder and harder for investment banks and it's frankly amazing that Deutsche's reckoning didn't come sooner.
MAGALI LOOTA, 19, MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY'S POSTCRASH ECONOMICS SOCIETY "I see generally quite positive things about the economy.
The airplane was destroyed by a postcrash fire at about 1500 Eastern time after impacting an approach lighting system and terrain while landing.
'These are road safety management, safer roads and mobility, safer vehicles, safer road users and better postcrash management.
They have also featured big-name guests while Hammond gave them his first postcrash interview.
The investigation will also include examining the procedures used to extinguish the battery fire and to remove and store the car postcrash. All aspects of the crash remain under investigation as the NTSB determines the probable cause with the intent of issuing safety recommendations to prevent similar crashes.
This clever history of pre and postcrash economics leaves key questions unanswered.
Safety researchers have relied on myriad statistical modeling techniques, applied to postcrash records and other noncrash specific data, to gain data-driven knowledge and understanding into crash causal circumstances.
But through the density of his intermingling literary references, puzzles and (deliberately) fanciful plot, comes Rushdie's true success: His great ability to capture the devilish mood of postcrash greed, political upheaval, and the rejection of the cosmopolitan, liberal west.
Aircraft cabin fires generally belong to one of the following three groups: ramp fires, in-flight fires, and postcrash fires [1].
As such, a Galbraithian supposition in the present context would be that some of Africa's banks (to greater or lesser extents) might have bypassed the postcrash surge of more intensive and extensive bank audits that occurred at the epicenter of the crisis.
(Those numbers, incidentally, in principal include undocumented immigrants as well as native-born Americans, naturalized citizens, and green-card holders.) In the wake of the 2008 crash, "consumption poverty" rose--but as of 2010, when postcrash conditions were possibly most dire, just 3.7-4.5 percent of America was subject to it, according to these same estimates.