postdebate

postdebate

(ˌpəʊstdɪˈbeɪt)
adj
of or relating to the period after a debate
adv
after a debate
References in periodicals archive ?
2007): "Applying a cognitive processing model to presidential debate effects: postdebate news analysis and primed reflection".
5) The predebate survey was conducted between September 19 and 22, 2008, and the postdebate survey was conducted between September 26 and 28, 2008.
Regina Santiago Nunez, coordinadora del proyecto de observacion electoral de OMCIM explica que para abordar como los usuarios de Twitter citaron o privilegiaron las diferentes encuestas en sus conversaciones, se recabaron dos muestras, una primera medicion el dia del debate, y una segunda tomada del lunes 7 al viernes 11 de mayo, fecha en que se publico la encuesta de Consulta Mitofsky, la ultima en publicar resultados postdebate.
at 14 (describing how in 1992 Philip Morris was able to "hang a large banner that was visible during postdebate interviews" after donating $250,000 (citing Jonathan Groner & Sheila Kaplan, Buying Smoke and Mirrors at the Debates, LEGAL TIMES, Nov.
The respondents then watched the full debates, without exposure to pre or postdebate media commentary.
Obama's weak performance resulted in some disparaging comments from the postdebate panel: Gergen speculated, "There is no chance of Obama's winning big now"; Borger commented, "Obama was trying to avoid any risk.
Barack Obama and Mitt Romney galloped out of the postdebate gate Tuesday to woo swing state voters in the final two weeks of a race that seems destined for a photo finish.
Applying a cognitiveprocessing model to presidential debate effects: Postdebate news analysis and primed reflection", Journal of Communication, 2007, 57, 40-59.
Short-Term Effects and Postdebate Consequences of Different Rhetorical Strategies in Televised Debates.
El cuarto error fue no participar en el postdebate, en las mesas de discusion en todos los medios donde se interpreta lo que paso en el.
Worse, from Kerry's point of view, some postdebate numbers show him dropping among low-income workers and urban voters, once the lifeblood of the Democratic Party.
To see truly frightening flakiness, all one had to do was tune in to the postdebate focus groups of "undecided voters" that the television networks kept putting before audiences this fall.