postdivestiture

postdivestiture

(ˌpəʊstdaɪˈvɛstɪtʃə)
adj
taking place after divestiture
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Colocation was employed, for example, to allow the postdivestiture long-distance AT&T to share access to certain key assets with the Bell Operating Companies that were being split off.
(249) It is plausible to infer that the Big Three tobacco companies, postdivestiture oil producers, or major film companies might have an understanding based upon their previous work together.
viewpoints postdivestiture may of course independently shed light on the
One issue at play was the question of whether postdivestiture local telephone carriers should be allowed to continue producing Yellow Page directories.
This raises the question, is it still meaningful to compare pre- and postdivestiture AT&T?
Postdivestiture, AT&T chose not to publish its WATS and leased line series, so the weighting method could no longer be used to derive a total minutes of use estimate after 1984.
Taylor, Postdivestiture Long-distance Competition in the United States, 83 AM.
Both Ward [1995] and Kahai, Kaserman, and Mayo [1996], based on an estimate of the price elasticity of AT&T's demand curve, strongly support the conclusion that the postdivestiture long-distance markets are largely competitive.
Taylor, "Postdivestiture Long-Distance Competition in the United States," American Economic Review, 82(2), May 1993, 185-190.
More importantly, the long-term trend in relative input prices does not appear to continue in the postdivestiture era.
To understand the European telecom manager's past problems, imagine the United States without the Bell system and without postdivestiture AT&T, MCI or Sprint.
The emphasis in the postdivestiture era will be on hi-tech innovation, not on such functions as service, customer relations and economy.