postexilic


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post·ex·il·ic

 (pōst′ĕg-zĭl′ĭk, -ĕk-sĭl′-) also post·ex·il·i·an (-ĕg-zĭl′ē-ən, -ĕk-sĭl′ē-ən)
adj.
Of or relating to the period of Jewish history following the Babylonian captivity (after 586 bc).

post•ex•il•ic

(ˌpoʊst ɛgˈzɪl ɪk, -ɛkˈsɪl-)

also post`ex•il′i•an,



adj.
relating to the Babylonian exile of the Jews, 597–538 b.c.
[1870–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.postexilic - of or relating to the period in Jewish history after 539 BC (after the Babylonian Captivity)
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References in periodicals archive ?
After an introduction that surveys the stages of modern critical scholarship from the nineteenth century to the present, each chapter thereafter gives a detailed review of scholarly methods used and the most recent perspectives for each major era in the Hebrew Bible's chronology, from the patriarchal-matriarchal period to the postexilic.
Aniconism was a late development in Israel; only in the postexilic period did it become the norm.
This volume focuses on Trito-Isaiah, understood to reflect a postexilic Judean context.
Synopsis: The last chapters of the book of Isaiah offer a vision of new hope at the dawn of the postexilic period.
In postexilic times prophecy declined as a prominent force and even ceased.
8x are references to the postexilic period in Judith and 1-2-3 Maccabees.
Both books, for example, narrate the postexilic project of rebuilding Jerusalem, physically, culturally and religiously, under Nehemiah, (19) but are silent on the expulsion of the foreign wives, an important part of that project (Ezek.
God, Society and Human Health in a Postexilic Revision of the Pentateuch (Exod.
Tweed coins the term "diasporic religion" to describe a set of religious symbols and practices that is located in one context (for example, postexilic Miami) but functions to transport practitioners to another (for example, preexilic Cuba).
Indeed, when the postexilic prophet Zechariah wants to reassure the restoration community of God's continuing commitment to them, he reiterates, "they shall be my people and I shall be their God" (Zech.
For a corrective to Hanson, sec Stephen L Cook, Prophecy and Apocalypticism: The Postexilic Social Setting (Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 1995)
In part 4 (on postcolonial interpretation) Lee compares postexilic Judah with Hong Kong, valuing hybridity, with various peoples forged into a new community, requiring inclusivity that embraces plurality.