postimperial

postimperial

(ˌpəʊstɪmˈpɪərɪəɪ)
adj
(Historical Terms) of, relating to, or designating the period after an empire
References in periodicals archive ?
Russia's postimperial nature is combined with a perhaps not-so-postimperial outlook, confounding national security policymaking.
The foreign policy of the contemporary United States is often portrayed as a continuation of its grand strategy during World War II and the Cold War, posits Professor Michael Lind in American Visions of a Postimperial World.
A general expansion from the "national" to a series of other levels of analysis is also the major point of Michael Reynolds's study of the Russian and Ottoman struggle over the Caucasus and Anatolia, which encompasses a broad comparative discussion about the two trajectories of imperial collapse and postimperial rebirth within a tighter focus on the importance of interstate competition in the borderlands.
Written at a time Britain was involved in negotiating and redefining its postimperial identity, Possession, like many other novels in that period, falls back on the memory of ancestors.
Form and Instability: Eastern Europe, Literature, PostImperial Difference
A collateral show, "Dissent and Discourse: The Art and Politics of Brij Mohan Anand," showcases the overlooked practice of the titular artist, whose drawings from the 1950s, '60s, and '70s use the tropes of sci-fi comics to staunchly critique the political tragedies and cultural hangovers of postimperial India.
Late in the novel, a minor character named Swanney loses a leg to gangrene and turns from drug dealing to panhandling, presenting himself as a Falklands veteran injured in service to his country, a correspondence that equates prolonged addictive drug use with a postimperial display of power.
17) Dominic Boyer,'From Algos to Autonomos: Nostalgic Eastern Europe as Postimperial Mania', in Maria Todorova and Zsuzsa Gille, eds.
Throughout, Hogsbjerg reminds us of James's prescience in imagining "a Britain without empire," a postcolonial and postimperial Britain, at the very height of British imperial hegemony, when the decolonization and nationalist movements that feel more inevitable now were unimaginable to most intellectual and political leaders of the period, except for James.
For example, Deborah Holmes and Lisa Silverman have indicated another characteristic of Vienna 1900 that becomes problematic for their exploration of postimperial Austria with its Red Vienna and Black Austria: "In order to prove itself worthy of study, then, interwar Vienna not only has to face down the notion that anything of cultural significance occurred in the years preceding the First World War, but also that during the interwar years everything of significance happened in Berlin" ("Introduction," in Interwar Vienna: Culture Between Tradition and Modernity [2009], 5).
Postwar and postimperial British theatre has provided diverse visions of home, while calling attention to "the performativity of national histories and identity" (6).
Chapter four turns to texts where children become the object of ideological capture for the postimperial future.