posting

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post·ing

 (pōs′tĭng)
n.
1. Something posted, as for public viewing.
2. An electronic message sent to and displayed on an online forum.

posting

(ˈpəʊstɪŋ)
n
(Wrestling) a wrestling attack in which the opponent is hurled at the post in one of the corners of the ring

posting

(ˈpəʊstɪŋ)
n
1. an appointment to a position or post, usually in another town or country
2. (Telecommunications) an electronic mail message sent to a bulletin board, website, etc, and intended for access by every user

post•ing

(ˈpoʊ stɪŋ)

n.
1. the act or process of entering data in an accounts ledger.
2. the record in a ledger after such entry.
[1665–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.posting - a sign posted in a public place as an advertisementposting - a sign posted in a public place as an advertisement; "a poster advertised the coming attractions"
sign - a public display of a message; "he posted signs in all the shop windows"
show bill, show card, theatrical poster - a poster advertising a show or play
flash card, flashcard - a card with words or numbers or pictures that is flashed to a class by the teacher
2.posting - (bookkeeping) a listing on the company's records; "the posting was made in the cash account"
bookkeeping, clerking - the activity of recording business transactions
list, listing - a database containing an ordered array of items (names or topics)
3.posting - the transmission of a letterposting - the transmission of a letter; "the postmark indicates the time of mailing"
transmission, transmittal, transmitting - the act of sending a message; causing a message to be transmitted

posting

noun
An item inserted, as in a diary, register, or reference book:
Translations

posting

[ˈpəʊstɪŋ] N
1. (Brit) (Mil etc) → destino m
2. (Fin) → asiento m, traspaso m al libro mayor

posting

[ˈpəʊstɪŋ] n (British) (by employer)affectation f
a overseas posting → un poste à l'étranger

posting

1
n (= transfer, assignment)Versetzung f; (Mil also) → Abkommandierung f; he’s got a new postinger ist wieder versetzt/abkommandiert worden; I’ve been given an overseas posting to Japanich bin auf einen Auslandsposten nach Japan versetzt worden

posting

2
n (on Internet forum) → Posting nt

posting

[ˈpəʊstɪŋ] n (Brit) → incarico
References in classic literature ?
AFTER waiting many a weary day to revenge himself upon a Lion for some unconsidered manifestation of contempt, a Skunk finally saw him coming, and posting himself in the path ahead uttered the inaudible discord of his race.
I noticed that she had sometimes other letters to post, but that the posting of the one only was a process.
There was nothing but sending out spies and scouts, posting sentinels and blowing the matches of harquebusses, though they carried but few, for almost all used flintlocks.
Most of this kind of disasters to traders and trappers arise from some careless inattention to the state of their arms and ammunition, the placing of their horses at night, the position of their camping ground, and the posting of their night watches.
At posting stations, at inns, and in the landowner's snuggery, maidservants had been flattered by his notice, and here too at the governor's party there were (as it seemed to Nicholas) an inexhaustible number of pretty young women, married and unmarried, impatiently awaiting his notice.
Sparsit sat by the fire, with her foot in her cotton stirrup, little thinking whither she was posting.
Wemmick was at his desk, lunching - and crunching - on a dry hard biscuit; pieces of which he threw from time to time into his slit of a mouth, as if he were posting them.
I will turn up at the posting station when he's setting off tomorrow, I'll catch him by the leg, I'll pull off his coat when he gets into the carriage.
They have been all hired this fortnight, and there are none left but those absolutely requisite for posting.
He had been on the point of posting his letter, when Mr.
So soon as Cora and Alice were seated, the scout, without regarding the element, directed Heyward to support one side of the frail vessel, and posting himself at the other, they bore it up against the stream, followed by the dejected owner of the dead foal.
Elizabeth found that her companion was really unable to proceed, and they completed their arrangement by posting Louisa out of the observation of the people who occasionally passed, but nigh the road, and in plain view of the whole valley.