postmodern


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Related to postmodern: Postmodern architecture

post·mod·ern

 (pōst-mŏd′ərn)
adj.
1. Of or relating to art, architecture, or literature that reacts against earlier modernist principles, as by reintroducing traditional or classical elements of style or by carrying modernist styles or practices to extremes: "It [a roadhouse]is so architecturally interesting ... with its postmodern wooden booths and sculptural clock" (Ruth Reichl).
2. Of or relating to an intellectual stance often marked by eclecticism and irony and tending to reject the universal validity of such principles as hierarchy, binary opposition, categorization, and stable identity.

post·mod′ern·ism n.
post·mod′ern·ist adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

postmodern

(pəʊstˈmɒdən)
adj
(Art Terms) (in the arts, architecture, etc) characteristic of a style and school of thought that rejects the dogma and practices of any form of modernism; in architecture, contrasting with international modernism and featuring elements from several periods, esp the Classical, often with ironic use of decoration
postˈmoderˌnism n
postˈmodernist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

post•mod•ern

(poʊstˈmɒd ərn)

adj.
1. (sometimes cap.) of or pertaining to any of various movements in architecture, the arts, and literature developing in the late 20th century in reaction to the precepts and austere forms of modernism and characterized by the use of historical and vernacular style elements and often fantasy, decoration, and complexity.
2. extremely modern; cutting-edge: postmodern kids who grew up on MTV.
[1945–50]
post•mod′ern•ism, n.
post•mod′ern•ist, adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.postmodern - of or relating to postmodernism; "postmodernist architecture"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

postmodern

[ˈpəʊstˈmɒdən] ADJposmoderno
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Published posthumously, Post-modern Music, Postmodern Listening by Jonathan D.
A few years ago, industry analyst firm Gartner recognised and validated this mission for the ERP industry as a whole-sounding the call for 'postmodern ERP'.
Postmodern Artistry in Medievalist Fiction: An International Study
7) Soukup approaches this question through a conceptual and methodological framework that is deeply invested in postmodern theory.
Thus, the unnatural is key to the book's larger project: reconsidering the position of postmodern narrative in literary history.
In this relatively short work, Laurel Brett argues for an understanding of the modern novel and postmodern novel as products of their two wars: World War I and World War II.
Gordon E Slethaug, Adaptation Theory and Criticism: Postmodern Literature and Cinema in the USA.
The Tribe of Pyn: Literary Generations in the Postmodern Period.
Pope Francis called the attacks part of a "disorganized World War 3." It is better to name what we have seen as the First Postmodern World War.
Tom Stoppard: Bucking the Postmodern. Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, 2012.
Thus, postmodern theorists and writers have insisted on dystopic visions, pastiches, parodies, collages, schizophrenic perceptions and developed a stance against characters as heroes, as the impelling force of the narration in modern texts.
Working within a postmodern understanding of the notion of identity, Gerin-Lajoie views identity as complex, fluid, and influenced by the power relations in which social practices take place.