potassium bitartrate


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potassium bitartrate

n.
A white, acid, crystalline solid or powder, KHC4H4O6, used in baking powder, in the tinning of metals, and as a component of laxatives. Also called cream of tartar.

potassium bitartrate

n
(Elements & Compounds) another name (not in technical usage) for potassium hydrogen tartrate
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.potassium bitartrate - a salt used especially in baking powder
salt - a compound formed by replacing hydrogen in an acid by a metal (or a radical that acts like a metal)
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the binding of potassium and precipitation of potassium bitartrate is also influenced by pH; potassium bitartrate becomes more insoluble as ethanol concentrations increase during fermentation, and it is not unusual for titratable acidities (TAs) to decrease by the end of primary fermentation due to the precipitation of potassium tartrate (Iland et al.
High potassium concentrations in must may promote excessive losses of tartaric acid, which is precipitated as potassium bitartrate, causing difficult and expensive costs in pH adjustment (Mpelasoka et al.
As a significant amount of tartaric acid would have precipitated as potassium bitartrate while grapes were freezing on the vines, total acidity (TA) in Icewine juice comprises a high percentage of malic acid, in the order of 65 to 75 per cent and varies with the pH of the juice.
The main influencing factors are likely to involve formation and precipitation of potassium bitartrate during vinification, (3,4) extraction of K from skins and time on skins during the making of red wines, (20) and possible adsorption of K on pomace.
Development of novel inhibitory methods for potassium bitartrate stabilization of wines has led to the commercialization of two revolutionary non-subtractive methods for stabilization: addition of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) reported in this article, and addition of a specific mannoprotein that will be the subject of a future article.