potboil

(redirected from potboiling)

pot·boil

 (pŏt′boil′)
intr.v. pot·boiled, pot·boil·ing, pot·boils
To produce potboilers.

[Back-formation from potboiler.]

potboil

(ˈpɒtˌbɔɪl)
vb (intr)
to produce a book, film or other creative work solely in order to make a living
References in periodicals archive ?
The acting -Sandra Bullock, Chris Cooper, Kevin Spacey - is better than a potboiling plot deserves.
This exhibition dispenses with the potboiling element and reveals, perhaps more effectively than any previous show, how wide-ranging his achievement is.
York argues that "we need a theory of literary celebrity" that doesn't simply conceive of a widely recognized author as "the high-culture personality artist" or "the crass-minded potboiling best-seller hack" (21).
Politicians are always telling us that there are not enough role models for the disenfranchised youth of the nation to copy Yet when Sefton rightly recognises a shining example of triumph over massive odds, these pigmies of local potboiling see a rare opportunity to get their names into print.
Give as good as you get: there will always be plenty of material there, and they appreciate a bloody good fight followed by potboiling hatred followed by a bloody good fight followed by .
Extracting the dandyism and occasional epigrams from Ouida's potboiling novels of falsetto masculinity, of hard fighting, hard riding aristocrats, Schaffer argues that Ouida's bestsellers were the founding documents of the aesthetic novel from Meredith and Wilde to Henry James: "Rereading Ouida's work reveals that the aesthetic novel largely derives from--of all places--popular women's writing.
Film lovers will be amazed how the proper editing turns a potboiling B-movie into a minor classic.
But by adapting Richard Matheson's potboiling action thriller novel Ride The Nightmare, all director Terence Young has managed to do is make a potboiling action thriller film.
Because the character in reality was so much more complex and interesting than the one served up here-he was, for example, an inveterate liar, nearly a charlatan, mentally unstable, and capable of great and poetic heights of passion, pride and self-pity-and I would think that makes for a far more intriguing novelistic figure, even in the potboiling world.
Brian Clemens' Edge of Darkness is a typical potboiling example of what younger generations have been missing.