pothook


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pot·hook

 (pŏt′ho͝ok′)
n.
1. A bent or hooked piece of iron for hanging a pot or kettle over a fire.
2. A curved iron rod with a hooked end used for lifting hot pots, irons, or stove lids.
3. A curved, S-shaped mark made in writing.
4.
a. often pothooks Illegible handwriting or aimless scribbling.
b. Informal Stenographic writing.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pothook

(ˈpɒtˌhʊk)
n
1. (Cookery) a curved or S-shaped hook used for suspending a pot over a fire
2. (Tools) a long hook used for lifting hot pots, lids, etc
3. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) an S-shaped mark, often made by children when learning to write
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pot•hook

(ˈpɒtˌhʊk)

n.
1. a hook for suspending a pot or kettle over an open fire.
2. an iron rod with a hook at the end used to lift hot pots, stove lids, etc.
3. an S-shaped stroke in writing.
[1425–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pothook - an S-shaped hook to suspend a pot over a firepothook - an S-shaped hook to suspend a pot over a fire
claw, hook - a mechanical device that is curved or bent to suspend or hold or pull something
trammel - an adjustable pothook set in a fireplace
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
"But why--why--why--did So-and-so do so-and-so?" Sophie would demand from her seat by the pothook; and Mrs.
The feeble fingers were never idle, and one of her pleasures was to make little things for the school children daily passing to and fro, to drop a pair of mittens from her window for a pair of purple hands, a needlebook for some small mother of many dolls, penwipers for young penmen toiling through forests of pothooks, scrapbooks for picture-loving eyes, and all manner of pleasant devices, till the reluctant climbers of the ladder of learning found their way strewn with flowers, as it were, and came to regard the gentle giver as a sort of fairy godmother, who sat above there, and showered down gifts miraculously suited to their tastes and needs.
There was a fat woman inside in a red jumper with pothooks and beasties embroidered upon it.