poulaine


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poulaine

(puːˈleɪn)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) the toe of a shoe heavily tapered into a narrow point, fashionable in the 14th-15th centuries
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a shoe made in this way
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
A red chaperon or cap, with long hanging cornette, sat daintily on the back of his black-curled head, while his gold-hued shoes were twisted up a la poulaine , as though the toes were shooting forth a tendril which might hope in time to entwine itself around his massive leg.
Her predecessor would have been the Cartesian Poulaine de la Barre who wrote, in 1673, De legalite des sexes.
It may be the medieval poulaine (a leather shoe with elongated pointed toe), the Roman leather bikini bottom, or perhaps the fingerprints of a potter preserved on a 2000-year-old pot.
He is thought to have got his inspiration from a 15th century shoe called the Poulaine which was condemned by the Church as provocative and phallic.
But still the drama continued as Furlong remonstrated with Yorkshire ref Richard Poulaine.
(2) This is something other than coldness: the hilarious linguistic excess of the prior physical description of Mr Endon is suffused with a reverence for his delicacy and beauty, even as it sustains the challenge to adequate visualization--the "perfection" of the tiny hairy body, the immense skull "crackling" with stiff black hair and its one tress of white, the dressing gown of "scarlet byssus" and the "neo-merovingian poulaines of deepest purple" (105).
When displayed, poulaines worn by men and chopines worn by women could serve as provocations akin to lingerie, aimed at strategically drawing attention to precisely that which it supposedly conceals.
Among the historic shoes, there are two examples of poulaines: Slippers with long, pointed toes, which fashion-conscious men were willing to trip over for a few hundred years during the Middle Ages.