pout

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Related to pouts: POTUS, poutiest

pout 1

 (pout)
v. pout·ed, pout·ing, pouts
v.intr.
1. To exhibit displeasure or disappointment; sulk.
2. To protrude the lips in an expression of displeasure or sulkiness.
3. To project or protrude: The child's lips pouted.
v.tr.
1. To push out or protrude (the lips).
2. To utter or express with a pout.
n.
1. A protrusion of the lips, especially as an expression of sullen discontent.
2. often pouts A fit of petulant sulkiness: sat around in the house in a pout; had the pouts.

[Middle English pouten, perhaps of Scandinavian origin.]

pout′i·ly adv.
pout′y adj.

pout 2

 (pout)
n. pl. pout or pouts
Any of various freshwater or marine fishes having a large head, especially an eelpout or a bullhead.

[Middle English *poute, from Old English -pūte (as in ǣlepūte, eelpout).]

pout

(paʊt)
vb
1. to thrust out (the lips), as when sullen, or (of the lips) to be thrust out
2. (intr) to swell out; protrude
3. (tr) to utter with a pout
n
4. (sometimes the pouts) a fit of sullenness
5. the act or state of pouting
[C14: of uncertain origin; compare Swedish dialect puta inflated, Danish pude pillow]
ˈpoutingly adv
ˈpouty adj

pout

(paʊt)
n, pl pout or pouts
1. (Animals) short for horned pout, eelpout
2. (Animals) any of various gadoid food fishes, esp the bib (also called whiting pout)
3. (Animals) any of certain other stout-bodied fishes
[Old English -pūte as in ǣlepūte eelpout; related to Dutch puit frog]

pout1

(paʊt)

v.i.
1. to thrust out the lips, esp. in displeasure or sullenness.
2. to look or be sullen.
3. to swell out or protrude, as lips.
v.t.
4. to protrude (the lips).
5. to utter with a pout.
n.
6. the act of pouting; protrusion of the lips.
7. a fit of sullenness: to be in a pout.
[1275–1325; Middle English; c. Swedish (dial.) puta to be inflated]
pout′ing•ly, adv.

pout2

(paʊt)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) pout, (esp. for kinds or species) pouts.
a northern marine food fish, Trisopterus luscus.
[before 1000; Old English -pūta, in ǣlepūta eelpout (not recorded in Middle English); c. Dutch puit frog]

pout


Past participle: pouted
Gerund: pouting

Imperative
pout
pout
Present
I pout
you pout
he/she/it pouts
we pout
you pout
they pout
Preterite
I pouted
you pouted
he/she/it pouted
we pouted
you pouted
they pouted
Present Continuous
I am pouting
you are pouting
he/she/it is pouting
we are pouting
you are pouting
they are pouting
Present Perfect
I have pouted
you have pouted
he/she/it has pouted
we have pouted
you have pouted
they have pouted
Past Continuous
I was pouting
you were pouting
he/she/it was pouting
we were pouting
you were pouting
they were pouting
Past Perfect
I had pouted
you had pouted
he/she/it had pouted
we had pouted
you had pouted
they had pouted
Future
I will pout
you will pout
he/she/it will pout
we will pout
you will pout
they will pout
Future Perfect
I will have pouted
you will have pouted
he/she/it will have pouted
we will have pouted
you will have pouted
they will have pouted
Future Continuous
I will be pouting
you will be pouting
he/she/it will be pouting
we will be pouting
you will be pouting
they will be pouting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pouting
you have been pouting
he/she/it has been pouting
we have been pouting
you have been pouting
they have been pouting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pouting
you will have been pouting
he/she/it will have been pouting
we will have been pouting
you will have been pouting
they will have been pouting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pouting
you had been pouting
he/she/it had been pouting
we had been pouting
you had been pouting
they had been pouting
Conditional
I would pout
you would pout
he/she/it would pout
we would pout
you would pout
they would pout
Past Conditional
I would have pouted
you would have pouted
he/she/it would have pouted
we would have pouted
you would have pouted
they would have pouted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pout - a disdainful grimacepout - a disdainful grimace      
grimace, face - a contorted facial expression; "she made a grimace at the prospect"
2.pout - marine eellike mostly bottom-dwelling fishes of northern seaspout - marine eellike mostly bottom-dwelling fishes of northern seas
blennioid, blennioid fish - elongated mostly scaleless marine fishes with large pectoral fins and reduced pelvic fins
viviparous eelpout, Zoarces viviparus - an eelpout of northern Europe that is viviparous
fish doctor, Gymnelis viridis - brightly colored scaleless Arctic eelpout
Macrozoarces americanus, ocean pout - common along northeastern coast of North America
3.pout - catfish common in eastern United Statespout - catfish common in eastern United States
bullhead catfish, bullhead - any of several common freshwater catfishes of the United States
Verb1.pout - be in a huff and display one's displeasure; "She is pouting because she didn't get what she wanted"
grizzle, stew, brood - be in a huff; be silent or sullen
2.pout - make a sad face and thrust out one's lower lip; "mop and mow"; "The girl pouted"
grimace, make a face, pull a face - contort the face to indicate a certain mental or emotional state; "He grimaced when he saw the amount of homework he had to do"

pout

verb
1. sulk, glower, mope, look sullen, purse your lips, look petulant, pull a long face, lour or lower, make a moue, turn down the corners of your mouth He whined and pouted like a kid when he didn't get what he wanted.
noun
1. sullen look, glower, long face, moue (French) She jutted her lower lip out in a pout.

pout

verb
To be sullenly aloof or withdrawn, as in silent resentment or protest:
noun
A facial contortion indicating displeasure, disgust, or pain:
Informal: mug.
Translations
تَبْويز، مَط الشِّفَتَيْن
ohrnovat nosvýraz nelibosti
lave trutmund
mutristaa
ajakbiggyesztésbiggyeszt
fÿlusvipur, stútursetja fÿlustút á munninn
nepatenkinta veido išraiškapatempti lūpą
saboztiesuzmest lūpuuzmesta lūpa
pruilenpruilmondjetuittuitentuitmondje
ohrnúť nosvýraz nevôle
dudak şişirmedudaklarını şişirmeksomurtmasomurtmak

pout

[paʊt]
A. Npuchero m, mohín m
B. VIhacer pucheros, hacer un mohín
C. VT "never!" she pouted-¡nunca! -dijo con gesto mohíno
to pout one's lipshacer pucheros, hacer un mohín

pout

[ˈpaʊt]
nmoue f

pout

1
n
(= facial expression)Schmollmund m
(= sulking fit)Schmollen nt; to have a poutschmollen
vi
(with lips) → einen Schmollmund machen, einen Flunsch or eine Schnute ziehen (inf)
(= sulk)schmollen
vt lipsschürzen; (sulkingly) → zu einem Schmollmund or Schmollen verziehen

pout

2
n (= kind of cod)Schellfisch m

pout

[paʊt]
1. nbroncio

pout

(paut) verb
(of a sulky child etc) to push the lips out as a sign of displeasure.
noun
this expression of the face.
References in classic literature ?
Formerly I had come to this pond adventurously, from time to time, in dark summer nights, with a companion, and, making a fire close to the water's edge, which we thought attracted the fishes, we caught pouts with a bunch of worms strung on a thread, and when we had done, far in the night, threw the burning brands high into the air like skyrockets, which, coming down into the pond, were quenched with a loud hissing, and we were suddenly groping in total darkness.
There have been caught in Walden pickerel, one weighing seven pounds -- to say nothing of another which carried off a reel with great velocity, which the fisherman safely set down at eight pounds because he did not see him -- perch and pouts, some of each weighing over two pounds, shiners, chivins or roach (Leuciscus pulchellus), a very few breams, and a couple of eels, one weighing four pounds -- I am thus particular because the weight of a fish is commonly its only title to fame, and these are the only eels I have heard of here; -- also, I have a faint recollection of a little fish some five inches long, with silvery sides and a greenish back, somewhat dace-like in its character, which I mention here chiefly to link my facts to fable.
At length you slowly raise, pulling hand over hand, some horned pout squeaking and squirming to the upper air.
Then I DON'T like that, and so I tell you plainly,' Rosa pouts.
The young girl's attention had been attracted to him for the last few moments; she had repeatedly turned her head towards him with uneasiness; she had even once come to a standstill, and taking advantage of a ray of light which escaped from a half-open bakery to survey him intently, from head to foot, then, having cast this glance, Gringoire had seen her make that little pout which he had already noticed, after which she passed on.
This little pout had furnished Gringoire with food for thought.
Resume your good-humor, -- you are ugly when you pout.
cried she, furious, "he has assumed his respectful air -- and he will pout for a week.
Petritsky, still humming, winked and made a pout with his lips, as though he would say: "Oh, yes, we know your Bryansky.
Celia's face had the shadow of a pouting expression in it, the full presence of the pout being kept back by an habitual awe of Dorothea and principle; two associated facts which might show a mysterious electricity if you touched them incautiously.
Not liking this abrupt removal, the child began to pout and cry.