practiser


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practiser

or

practicer

n
someone who practises something, esp a trade or skill; practitioner
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Cedric was no ready practiser of the art of dissimulation, and would at this moment have been much the better of a hint from Wamba's more fertile brain.
"Not at all; not a professor, as your town-folks have it; and, what is worse, I'm afraid, not a practiser, either."
Yoga Moves, an event hosted by long-term yoga practiser Vicki Snow, is taking place at Patshull Hall, near Wolverhampton, and is one of the first events in a series of yogic experiences in and around the area.
I crave excitement, I think, as much as the next person, but I am also a long-time practiser of moderation.
If you are a student, be also a student of the body, a practiser [sic] of manly exercises, realizing that a broad chest, a muscular pair of arms, and two sinewy legs, will be just as much credit to you, and stand you in hand through your future life, equally with your geometry, your history, your classics, your law, medicine, or divinity.
Experiments were the hight of their knowledge, and so we may suppose when a practiser had killed 4 or 500 he might pass for a doctor.
In Douce's own detailed and systematic study on the subject, he posited that although 'awful and impressive as must ever be the contemplation of our mortality in the mind of the philosopher and practiser of true religion, the mere sight of a skeleton cannot, as to them, excite any alarming sensation whatever.
He's rated the most obsessive practiser on the circuit, so we know he'll be ready to roll on his Kapalua bow, whereas some of the others have almost certainly put golf on the back burner in favour of eating, drinking and quality time at home.
1902) ("All original Parties to the Suit, and likewise all those who come in pendente Life, and are made Parties thereto by Process, are bound by the Decree."); 1 JOSEPH HARRISON, THE ACCOMPLISH'D PRACTISER IN THE HIGH COURT OF CHANCERY 32 (1779) [hereinafter 1 HARRISON] ("[N]one but such as were parties and those claiming under them can be bound by [a decree].").
He wants to improve all the time - he's the best practiser I've ever seen."
On the other hand, the modernists look to the common practiser of using "he" to mean he or she, which is probably far more likely.