pragmaticist

pragmaticist

(præɡˈmætɪsɪst)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy a follower of the doctrine of pragmatism
2. (Linguistics) linguistics an expert in pragmatics
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Mats Bergman argues in "Improving our Habits," contra Peirce's self-proclaimed conservatism, that his pragmaticist inquiry leads to a meliorism which can help improve our habits of inquiry insofar as intelligent methods change our intellectual habits.
One imagines from his book's pragmaticist arguments that Tyler would dispute that there is any other meaningful kind.
Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen likewise attempts to compare Peirce's diagrammatic pragmaticist philosophy of mathematics to the larger schools of the 20th century, but finds no easy fit.
Peirce characterized himself at various times as a conditional idealist, a scholastic realist and a pragmaticist. It is clear that Peirce was struggling to find a name for his philosophy, and I am suggesting "process metaphysician" is the most accurate.
A survey of these five opinions by Justice Souter reveals that he is not uniformly historicist, textualist, formalist, instrumentalist, pragmaticist, or minimalist when it comes to the civil rules.
Perhaps the phenomenological and ethical grounding of Peircean 'pragmaticist' semiotics can break the impasse between the cultures of identity which so radically--and indeed tragically--lead to the fragmentation of resistance against the global controlling minority of neo-liberal political economy.
1993: "Lewis Carroll: Subversive Pragmaticist." Pragmatics 3.4: 367-85.
In this way I suggest a first tentative model of how cybernetics and system theory in the advanced second order version can be united in a complementary way with pragmaticist semiotics, cognitive semantics and language game theory.
Duns Scotus was always much appreciated by the North American pragmaticist.(74) Furthermore, this Scotistic influence was reinforced through the use made by Peirce of the Conimbricenses, that is, the work of the Jesuit professors of Coimbra, the authors of the celebrated Cursus of the end of the sixteenth and beginning of the seventeenth century, already under the influence, as master, of Pedro da Fonseca, who followed Scotus more than Aquinas.
The pragmaticist does not make the summum bonum to consist in action, but makes it to consist in that process of evolution whereby the existent comes more and more to embody those generals which were just now said to be destined, which is what we strive to express in calling them reasonable.
According to Laudan (1977, 1996), however, Rorty is not even regarded as a pragmaticist.