pragmatism

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prag·ma·tism

(prăg′mə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Philosophy A movement consisting of varying but associated theories, originally developed by Charles S. Peirce and William James and distinguished by the doctrine that the meaning or truth value of an idea or a proposition lies in its observable practical consequences.
2. A practical, matter-of-fact way of approaching or assessing situations or of solving problems.

prag′ma·tist n.
prag′ma·tis′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pragmatism

(ˈpræɡməˌtɪzəm)
n
1. action or policy dictated by consideration of the immediate practical consequences rather than by theory or dogma
2. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the doctrine that the content of a concept consists only in its practical applicability
b. the doctrine that truth consists not in correspondence with the facts but in successful coherence with experience. See also instrumentalism
ˈpragmatist n, adj
ˌpragmaˈtistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

prag•ma•tism

(ˈpræg məˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. character or conduct that emphasizes practical results or concerns rather than theory or principle.
2. a philosophical movement or system having various forms, but generally stressing practical consequences as constituting the essential criterion in determining meaning, truth, or value.
[1860–65]
prag′ma•tist, n., adj.
prag`ma•tis′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pragmatism

a philosophical system stressing practical consequences and values as standards by which the validity of concepts are to be determined. — pragmatist, n., adj.pragmatistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pragmatism

An American philosophical school; the view that the meaning of things is in their practical relation to people.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pragmatism - (philosophy) the doctrine that practical consequences are the criteria of knowledge and meaning and value
instrumentalism - a system of pragmatic philosophy that considers idea to be instruments that should guide our actions and their value is measured by their success
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.pragmatism - the attribute of accepting the facts of life and favoring practicality and literal truth
practicality - concerned with actual use rather than theoretical possibilities
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
pragmatisme
pragmatismo

pragmatism

[ˈprægmətɪzəm] Npragmatismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pragmatism

[ˈprægmətɪzəm] npragmatisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pragmatism

nPragmatismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pragmatism

[ˈprægməˌtɪzm] npragmatismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Schiller, was one of the three founders of pragmatism. The view of the "behaviourists" is that nothing can be known except by external observation.
Dollop, the spirited landlady of the Tankard in Slaughter Lane, who had often to resist the shallow pragmatism of customers disposed to think that their reports from the outer world were of equal force with what had "come up" in her mind.
Arthur Lovejoy, "The Thirteen Pragmatisms," in Arthur Lovejoy, Thirteen Pragmatisms and Other Essays (Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press, 1963), pp.
In Action and Existence: The Case for Agent Causation, James Swindal develops and defends a detailed, well-informed, and therapeutic argument valuable to anyone with serious interests in pragmatism, action, and agency.
He had not satisfaction of William James method, pragmatism theorist and changed his theory name from pragmatism to pragmatisms in 1905.
Menand of course acknowledges important variations among the pragmatisms of Holmes, James, Peirce, and Dewey, and delves thoughtfully into them.
His perspectives are classical American pragmatism, pragmatics and pragmatisms, a Kantian rationalist pragmatism, an arc of thought from Rorty's eliminative materialism to his pragmatism, synthesizing naturalism and historicism, toward an analytic pragmatism, and expressivism and anti-representationalism.
Pragmatism: The Restoration of its Scientific Roots.
He also contends that close attention to the role of inquiry and its consequences for belief formation in their works provides a means for fully appreciating pragmatism's richness.
Pragmatism returned, after decades of neglect, to the focus of philosophical discussion in the 1970-80s, largely thanks to its most famous contemporary proponent, Richard Rorty, who died in 2007.