pragmatist


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prag·ma·tism

(prăg′mə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Philosophy A movement consisting of varying but associated theories, originally developed by Charles S. Peirce and William James and distinguished by the doctrine that the meaning or truth value of an idea or a proposition lies in its observable practical consequences.
2. A practical, matter-of-fact way of approaching or assessing situations or of solving problems.

prag′ma·tist n.
prag′ma·tis′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pragmatist - an adherent of philosophical pragmatism
realist - a philosopher who believes that universals are real and exist independently of anyone thinking of them
2.pragmatist - a person who takes a practical approach to problems and is concerned primarily with the success or failure of her actions
realist - a person who accepts the world as it literally is and deals with it accordingly
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

pragmatist

[ˈprægmətɪst] Npragmatista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pragmatist

[ˈprægmətɪst] npragmatiste m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pragmatist

nPragmatiker(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
A third point, perhaps not quite so certain as our previous two, is that the truth of memory cannot be wholly practical, as pragmatists wish all truth to be.
William James figured there as well as "Weary Willie," and pragmatists alternated with pugilists in the long procession of its portraits.
Guardiola pragmatist realised finisher unsurpassed Tyrone But the Argentinian wasn't prepared to call time, to accept he didn't fit in the plans of the Guardiola's perfect football.
LEIGH POMLETT has outlined his vision for Walsall by describing himself as an "ambitious pragmatist."
He does not argue that Nietzsche was a pragmatist, only that the pragmatist feature of his work is far deeper and more substantial than most scholars believe.
For over 150 years the fledgling pragmatist movement has strenuously critiqued this approach.
The participants were found to use all the four learning types namely activist, theorist, reflector and pragmatist. The most common combination of learning style preferences in decreasing order of frequency were: Theorist/Reflector, Theorist/Pragmatist, Reflector/Pragmatist and Pragmatist/Activist.
As you probably noticed, my title is ambiguous--deliberately so, because my purpose here is twofold: to teach legal theorists something of the pragmatist tradition in philosophy, its history, its character, and its content; and to suggest some of the ways in which the intellectual resources of that tradition can enhance our understanding of the law.
I don't know what his exact style is -- he has been a pragmatist at some clubs, got the ball down and played with it at others, and managed clubs with money and without.
A pragmatist would say a federal solution would enable the return of thousands of Greek Cypriots to their land and at the same time stem the flow of Turkish nationals coming to Cyprus.
Afterwards a Welsh Government source confirmed that Mr Davis was seen as a pragmatist, in contrast to Theresa May and some other Ministers.
Iranians are voting in a closely fought presidential contest between pragmatist incumbent Hassan Rouhani and the hard-line Ebrahim Raisi.