pragmatization

pragmatization

(ˌpræɡmətaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

pragmatisation

n
the action of putting theory into practice, the process of rendering something more pragmatic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Iser, the imaginary is concomitant to a human "plasticity," which, like the fictive, takes over an active part in the pragmatization of reality.
In the same movement, Catholic sermons reflect a pragmatization of religious narratives.
In this sense, Zhou interpreted humanism as "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" ("naturalization of ethics") and "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" (pragmatization of morality") in the social context of occupied China (Bitter Mouth 18).
Would it be less convincing to propose instead that a process of pragmatization is inscribed into the sources, a development that led to the application of a general notion--the idea of "correctness"--to a set of more clearly delimited practical issues?
Ulrich sees his task as the pragmatization of the ideal speech situation, and a marriage between 'critical' and 'systems' thinking is the means by which this can be achieved.
Iser finds that we can come to some understanding of meaning if we accept that the "pragmatization of the imaginary" is brought about by an "expectation of meaningfulness" in literature (18), a concept again that echoes Culler's reading conventions.
Alvesson and Skoldberg aim to bridge the gap between the abstractions of the philosophy of science and the technicalities of research methods, characterizing their project either as 'the intellectualization of qualitative method' or as a 'pragmatization of the philosophy of science'.
Yet in the wake of this, a growing "pragmatization" of Lutheran ecclesiology took place -- promoted not the least through the state-church system -- creating a marked vacuum in our theology of the church as the body of Christ.