prairie schooner

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prairie schooner

n.
A covered wagon, drawn by horses or oxen, that was used by pioneers in crossing the North American prairies and plains.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prairie schooner

n
(Historical Terms) chiefly US a horse-drawn covered wagon similar to but smaller than a Conestoga wagon, used in the 19th century to cross the prairies of North America
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

prai′rie schoon`er


n.
a covered wagon similar to the Conestoga wagon, used by pioneers in crossing the prairies and plains of North America.
[1835–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prairie schooner - a large wagon with broad wheels and an arched canvas topprairie schooner - a large wagon with broad wheels and an arched canvas top; used by the United States pioneers to cross the prairies in the 19th century
waggon, wagon - any of various kinds of wheeled vehicles drawn by an animal or a tractor
caravan, wagon train, train - a procession (of wagons or mules or camels) traveling together in single file; "we were part of a caravan of almost a thousand camels"; "they joined the wagon train for safety"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Before her rolled the quarter section, except for the little box-house, as bare of fences and buildings as when the Wades had first camped on it in their prairie schooner. With what strange prophetic vision had Martin foreseen so clearly that all the construction of his life would crumble.
She knew it had crossed the plains with her people in a prairie schooner. It was of solid mahogany.
As Kauffman puts it, "As romantic as prairie schooners and the Hesperian exodus to the fruited plain may be, the real honor resides with those who stayed put.