prairie soil


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prairie soil

n
(Geological Science) a soil type occurring in temperate areas formerly under prairie grasses and characterized by a black A horizon, rich in plant foods
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Noun1.prairie soil - a type of soil occurring under grasses in temperate climates
dirt, soil - the part of the earth's surface consisting of humus and disintegrated rock
References in periodicals archive ?
These hardy folks braved the journey out to North Dakota, plowed the solid prairie soil, and established towns like Hebron all throughout North Dakota.
2] emissions from soil with and without termites present will enhance our understanding of normal metabolic gas flux into the atmosphere from tallgrass prairie soil, thereby increasing our knowledge of baseline background gas emissions.
The number of living organisms in healthy topsoil is enormous: It has been estimated, for example, that the total biomass of organisms in prairie soil exceeds 15 tons per acre, with the weight of the bacteria alone--invisible to the eye--totaling 13 tons
As settlers homesteaded in Wood Lake Township, they plowed the prairie soil and planted small grains.
2] concentrations consistent with what is commonly found in prairie soil gas in summer.
Dirt farmers, recognizing the grain growing potential of rich prairie soil, wanted to practice intensive farming, but their crops were often ravaged by roaming herds of cattle, sheep and particularly the so-called "land sharks"--herds of half-wild hogs that ran loose until they were rounded up and driven eastward to market.
Relation of root distribution to organic matter in prairie soil.
That includes Fender's blue butterfly larvae, which are growing on the prairie soil this time of year.
The rich prairie soil surrounding the city was perfect for large-scale cotton production.
Memories of Copenhagen poppies, elves, and the Norns (sisters of fate) ground the newcomer more deeply than the thin Canadian prairie soil.
Organic matter extends deeper into prairie soil, because grass roots can decay deep in the soil while organic matter in forest soils comes mainly from the decay of surface litter.
In the shallow Jepson Prairie soil, total plant growth reflected rooting restriction, greater soil moisture limitation, and, presumably, a higher degree of physiological stress.