praising


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praise

 (prāz)
n.
1. Expression of approval, commendation, or admiration.
2. The extolling or exaltation of a deity, ruler, or hero.
3. Archaic A reason for praise; merit.
tr.v. praised, prais·ing, prais·es
1. To express warm approval of, commendation for, or admiration for.
2. To express a feeling of veneration or gratitude to (a deity); worship or glorify.

[Middle English preise, from preisen, to praise, from Old French preisier, from Late Latin pretiāre, to prize, from Latin pretium, price; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

prais′er n.
Synonyms: praise, acclaim, commend, extol, laud
These verbs mean to express approval or admiration. To praise is to voice approbation, commendation, or esteem: "She was enthusiastically praising the beauties of Gothic architecture" (Francis Marion Crawford).
Acclaim usually implies hearty approbation warmly and publicly expressed: The film was highly acclaimed by many critics. Commend suggests moderate or restrained approval, as that accorded by a superior: The judge commended the jury for their hard work. Extol suggests exaltation or glorification: "that sign of old age, extolling the past at the expense of the present" (Sydney Smith).
Laud connotes respectful or lofty praise: "Comtosook was lauded as the most picture-perfect hamlet in the state" (Jodi Picoult).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.praising - full of or giving praise; "a laudatory remark"
complimentary - conveying or resembling a compliment; "a complimentary remark"
References in classic literature ?
She did not cease chattering good-naturedly and gaily, continually praising Natasha's beauty.
Anselmo was completely satisfied by the words of Lothario, and believed them as fully as if they had been spoken by an oracle; nevertheless he begged of him not to relinquish the undertaking, were it but for the sake of curiosity and amusement; though thenceforward he need not make use of the same earnest endeavours as before; all he wished him to do was to write some verses to her, praising her under the name of Chloris, for he himself would give her to understand that he was in love with a lady to whom he had given that name to enable him to sing her praises with the decorum due to her modesty; and if Lothario were unwilling to take the trouble of writing the verses he would compose them himself.
Mrs Fitzpatrick was a little nettled at this; and indeed, if it may not be called a lapse of the tongue, it was a small deviation from politeness in Jones, and into which he scarce would have fallen, had not the delight he felt in praising Sophia hurried him out of all reflection; for this commendation of one cousin was more than a tacit rebuke on the other.
After praising the children and getting them to promise not to cheat, the researcher left the room for a minute in the middle of the game.
Praising a child's ability implies that the specific behavior that is commented on stems from stable traits related to one's ability, such as smartness.
I made it a priority to look for anything and everything going right and immediately praising the person who made it possible.
Way to go," with no discernible pause, while still praising one specific behavior or student response.
In such instances, a boy is often heard praising his father's bull by saying 'Aah Dyamluthi [the name of the bull]
But Prof Sanders says: "You can create a new reward for your children by making a point of noticing and praising them when they behave in a way you want to encourage.
Praising kids a vital part of teaching them to try new things and step out of their comfort zones.
2) Positive feedback about talent seems to lead to performance goals, whereas praising effort leads to learning goals, which are associated with higher achievement In the long run.